Louise Bonnet at Galerie Max Hetzler
Online, 12 March 2021
Louise Bonnet, Untitled (2021). Coloured pencil on paper. 64 x 76.8 cm (framed). Courtesy Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin | Paris | London. Photo: def image © Louise Bonnet.

We loved this brilliantly strange coloured pencil on paper work from Louise Bonnet's OVR with Galerie Max Hetzler, echoing the accentuated Surrealist forms of Man Ray and Dorothea Tanning.


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Thomas Demand at FIAC
Online, 09 March 2021
Thomas Demand, Canopy (2020) C-print/Diasec. 180 × 144 cm. © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2021. Courtesy Sprüth Magers.

A highlight from last week's FIAC OVR. Thomas Demand's recent show at Sprüth Magers is exceptional.

Demand's painstakingly detailed and unique approach to model-making and photographing challenges how we make and absorb images, and interrogates artists', as well as society's, relationship with appropriation.

Cindy Sherman at FIAC
Online, 06 March 2021
Cindy Sherman, Untitled (1989). Chromogenic color print. 96.5 x 69.9 cm. Edition of 6, AP 1/1. Courtesy Metro Pictures.

One of Cindy Sherman's 'History Portraits' from the late 1980s featured in Metro Pictures' FIAC OVR last week.

Sherman humorously plays with Old Master portraiture tropes, whilst alluding to the male gaze and more specifically, the objectification of women.

Takesada Matsutani at FIAC
Online, 05 March 2021
Takesada Matsutani, Point de Contact 65-12 (1986). Vinyl adhesive, acrylic and graphite on paper mounted on canvas. 162 x 130 cm. © Takesada Matsutani. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Thomas Barratt.

This beautiful 1986 painting by Takesada Matsutani, a Japanese artist from the Gutai group, featured in Hauser & Wirth's FIAC OVR.

Incorporating vinyl adhesive to create tactile and curvaceous forms protruding from the canvas, Matsutani's painting expands the possibilities of surface, whilst remaining tightly bound to the colour black, except for a deliciously deep blue emerging from underneath.

Hans Arp at FIAC
Online, 04 March 2021
Hans Arp, Die Puppe der Demeter / La poupée de Déméter (Demeter''s Doll) (1961, cast 1974). Bronze, Ed. 3/5 + 2 AP, 41 x 15 x 15 cm. © Stiftung Arp e.V., Berlin/Rolandswerth / 2021 ProLitteris, Zürich, ARS, New York, and DACS, London. Courtesy Stiftung Arp e.V., Berlin/Rolandswerth and Hauser & Wirth.

Hauser & Wirth featured this small but mighty Hans Arp bronze in their FIAC OVR presentation.

A master at creating biomorphic forms whose curved lines and simplicity are so pleasurable for our eyes to trace, Arp's instantly recognisable amoeba-like shapes are equally satisfying in this smaller scale.

Tom Waring at FIAC
Online, 03 March 2021
Tom Waring, Plutch Jarv (2020) (detail). Oil on linen. 180 x 140 cm. © the artist. Courtesy Downs & Ross, New York.
Tom Waring, Plutch Jarv (2020) (detail). Oil on linen. 180 x 140 cm. © the artist. Courtesy Downs & Ross, New York.
Tom Waring, Plutch Jarv (2020). Oil on linen. 180 x 140 cm. © the artist. Courtesy Downs & Ross, New York.

This recent painting by Tom Waring showing with New York gallery Downs & Ross in their viewing rooms for FIAC was an absolute highlight for us.

Painstakingly created in oil on linen and restricting himself with variations of just one or two colours, Waring constructs claustrophobic compositions that mould together forms and imagery mined from a vast array of art historical references.

Maja Ruznic at Hales Gallery
London, 02 March 2021
Maja Ruznic, Invocation (2019). Oil on canvas. 213.36 x 187.96 cm. Courtesy the artist and Karma, New York.

Maja Ruznic's ethereal works are formed through her experience recalling memories from her diasporic childhood.

Softly rendered washes of oil paint shimmer and fade across the canvas, revealing forms and figures from her past.

Maja Ruznic is represented by Karma, in addition to Hales Gallery, where she recently held her first solo show in their London space towards the end of last year.

Stanley Whitney at Matthew Marks Gallery
Los Angeles, 25 February 2021
Stanley Whitney, Twenty twenty (2020). Oil on linen. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery.

'The only system I have really is top, middle, and bottom. Even if I wanted to make a red painting, I couldn't do it. I have to let the colour take me wherever it takes me.'—Stanley Whitney

Stanley Whitney's gorgeous grids of colour are on view in How Black is That Blue at the Los Angeles space of Matthew Marks Gallery, but they are also a joy to absorb online, such is the power of this sublime colourist's compositions.

Robert Rauschenberg at Thaddaeus Ropac
London, 24 February 2021
Robert Rauschenberg, Florida Reservoir (Phantom) (1991) (detail). Silkscreen ink on anodised mirrored aluminium. 127.7 x 307 cm. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by Adagp, Paris, 2020. Photo: Glenn Steigemann.
Robert Rauschenberg, Florida Reservoir (Phantom) (1991). Silkscreen ink on anodised mirrored aluminium. 127.7 x 307 cm. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by Adagp, Paris, 2020. Photo: Glenn Steigemann.
Robert Rauschenberg, Portal (Night Shade) (1991). Tarnish and silkscreen ink on brushed aluminium. 104.1 x 124.5 cm. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by Adagp, Paris, 2020. Photo: Glenn Steigemann.

Two series of Robert Rauschenberg's works produced in the early 1990s are on show in the exhibition Night Shades and Phantoms at Thaddaeus Ropac in London, which will open after the current lockdown restrictions are lifted.

Where his focus on the materiality of paint in 1950s New York alongside Jasper Johns became the precursor for Pop Art, these works from the early 1990s were revolutionary for his ability to assemble painting, photography, and sculpture into a single frame.

On this approach to art-making, the artist David Salle wrote, 'Rauschenberg knew how to let forms and masses invade and affect each other, energising the surface to build a sense of pictorial consequence, itself part of something larger, deeper'.

Jessie Homer French at Massimo De Carlo
London, 23 February 2021
Jessie Homer French, Pine Forest Fire (2019) (detail). Ex. Unique, oil on plywood. 30.5 x 44.5 cm. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo. Photo: Damian Griffiths.
Jessie Homer French, Pine Forest Fire (2019). Ex. Unique, oil on plywood. 30.5 x 44.5 cm. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

West Coast is the magical self-taught artist Jessie Homer French's debut exhibition at Massimo De Carlo in their London space.

Homer French's paintings are often naïve in style with unusual details and large areas of flatness, but a sensitivity and softness nearly always pervades.

Henri Rousseau seems an obvious influence, along with Ed Ruscha and his famous painting, The Los Angeles County Museum on Fire (1965–1968).

Charline von Heyl at Corbett vs. Dempsey
Chicago, 20 February 2021
Charline von Heyl, The August Complex (2020). Acrylic on linen. 208.28 x 198.12 cm. Courtesy the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago. Photo: Tom Van Eynde.

If anyone can be attributed with keeping painting progressive and shifting its parameters—without resorting to the re-hashing of past tropes—it must surely be Charline von Heyl.

This incredible recent painting, showing at Corbett vs. Dempsey until 13 March, perfectly encapsulates her relentless desire to create startlingly unique images through the medium of paint.

Her use of jarring colours and motifs interplay with a crisp flatness that jolts us into clutching at why we feel a certain sensation from absorbing these enigmatic compositions.

A unique visionary within the realm of contemporary image making.

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