Sue Williamson
at Goodman Gallery

London, 19 April 2021
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998) (detail). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998) (detail). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998) (detail). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.

Devoting her 40-year career to the documentation of political and social struggles during South Africa's apartheid, Sue Williamson presents her extraordinary first solo exhibition at Goodman Gallery in London, running until 24 April. ⁠⁠

Included in this exhibition is her 1998 series 'Truth Games', consisting of sliding perspex slats brandished with verbal evidence of apartheid's brutality given in court before the TRC (Truth and Reconciliation Commission), alongside newspaper imagery and text. ⁠⁠


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Dexter Dalwood
at Simon Lee Gallery

London, 15 April 2021
Dexter Dalwood, Diane Arbus (2008). Collage on paper. 46 x 46 x 4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Simon Lee Gallery.
Dexter Dalwood, Anthony Blunt (2003). Collage on paper. 46 x 46 x 4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Simon Lee Gallery.

We love Dexter Dalwood's cool cut-and-paste collages of empty domestic interiors weaving themes of art history, politics, and personal experience in his wonderfully patchworked perspectives. ⁠⁠

As households empty across the U.K. with the easing of Covid restrictions, the artist's exhibition at Simon Lee Gallery, running until 8 May 2021, is timely, while reminding us of the supremacy of this space over the past year. ⁠⁠

Lucy Bull at David Kordansky Gallery
Los Angeles, 14 April 2021
Lucy Bull, The Bottoms (2021). Oil on linen. 182.9 x 248.9 x 2.5 cm. Courtesy David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. ⁠⁠Photo: Jeff McLane.
Lucy Bull, The Bottoms (2021) (detail). Oil on linen. 182.9 x 248.9 x 2.5 cm. Courtesy David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. ⁠⁠Photo: Jeff McLane.

Lucy Bull creates visionary synaesthetic works, adopting surrealist rhythmic brushwork to encourage your eyes to dance around the canvas and soak in the daubs and swirls of colour in every inch of the work. ⁠⁠

As the artist has explained, 'The marks oscillate from being imprints from the tip of my brush to more finessed and directionally specific as I start to trace these sensations'.

Bull's latest solo exhibition with David Kordansky Gallery, Skunk Grove, is on view in Los Angeles until 1 May 2021.

Bold Palettes at Gallery 1957
13 April 2021
Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe, Untitled (2020). Acrylic and oil on canvas. 193.04 x 185.42 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957. 
Kwesi Botchway, Self Portrait (2020). 57 x 42 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957. 
Kwesi Botchway, Self Portrait (2020). 57 x 42 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957. 

Three of West Africa's next generation art world stars are exhibiting at Gallery 1957 in a group show titled Homecoming: The Aesthetic of the Cool, running until 9 May. ⁠⁠

Fellow graduates of Ghanatta College of Art and Design, Amoako Boafo, Kwesi Botchway, and Otis Quaicoe have made headlines for their meteoric rise and sensational auction results in the last few years.

Celebrated for their bold chromatic palettes and vivacious representation of their subjects, all three artists seamlessly reclaim the ideologies of Blackness while redefining West Africa's position within the contemporary art world. ⁠⁠

In recent years, Ghana has taken centre stage as Africa's artistic hub, producing some of the biggest names in art today, including Ibrahim Mahama, El Anatsui, and Gideon Appah.⁠⁠

Ray Johnson at David Zwirner
New York, 10 April 2021
Ray Johnson, Untitled (Max Ern with Elephants and Swans) (1982/1994). © Ray Johnson Estate. Courtesy the Ray Johnson Estate ⁠⁠
Ray Johnson, Untitled (Cupid with Ad Reinhardt) (1974). © Ray Johnson Estate. Courtesy the Ray Johnson Estate.
Ray Johnson, David Bourdon (1971). © Ray Johnson Estate. Courtesy the Ray Johnson Estate.

Timeless and wonderfully wry, Ray Johnson's Neo-Dada collages are the subject of WHAT A DUMP, a solo exhibition running until 22 May at David Zwirner's West 19th Street location. ⁠⁠

Immersed in the artistic community of 1950s New York, Johnson's collages, or 'moticos', of magazines, photography, and doodles are saturated with gay icons of the 20th century.

These collages reflect the ethos of his New York Correspondence School, which gave rise to the Fluxus movement of the 1960s. ⁠⁠

Lenz Geerk at EXPO CHGO ONLINE
Online, 09 April 2021
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.

We love Lenz Geerk's black and white acrylic on canvas works from EXPO CHGO ONLINE, which ran between 8 and 12 April 2021.

Roberts Projects presented these works alongside several other new paintings by Evan Nesbit, and Brenna Youngblood. ⁠⁠

Rebecca Warren at Matthew Marks Gallery
New York, 09 April 2021
Rebecca Warren, The Territory 2020. Hand-painted bronze on painted MDF pedestal. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery.

Rebecca Warren is an artist much loved by Ocula Advisor Rory Mitchell, and her latest exhibition at Matthew Marks Gallery is sublime. Among nine hand-painted bronze sculptures is this standout two-part work titled The Territory (2020).

Despite having the appearance of MDF and plywood, the lower arrangements have actually been cast in bronze and meticulously painted to replicate the original pieces of wood from her studio. Each part looks absurdly identical to the other, but on closer inspection, there are subtle differences.

This doubling has been a recurring theme throughout much of Warren's career, although the flag-like figures with richly painted symbols contain an otherworldly feel that is refreshingly new within her oeuvre, and in stark contrast to the seemingly everyday studio materials on which they rest.

Rebecca Warren is also represented by Maureen Paley in London and Galerie Max Hetzler in Berlin and Paris.

Asuka Anastacia Ogawa at Blum & Poe
Los Angeles, 07 April 2021
Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Home (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 215.9 x 241.3 x 4.4 cm. © Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/NewYork/Tokyo⁠⁠.
Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Home (2021) (detail). Acrylic on canvas. 215.9 x 241.3 x 4.4 cm. © Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/NewYork/Tokyo⁠⁠.
Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Home (2021) (detail). Acrylic on canvas. 215.9 x 241.3 x 4.4 cm. © Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/NewYork/Tokyo⁠⁠.

Blum & Poe are showing captivating paintings by Asuka Anastacia Ogawa at their Los Angeles space.

Marking a year since being taken on by the gallery, these works showcase Ogawa's use of flat planes of colour and muted tones that seem to enhance her figures' piercing eyes, unnervingly gazing out towards us.

In Ocula Magazine Associate Editor Tessa Moldan delved further into ⁠Ogawa's dream-like settings, remarking that Ogawa's paintings are 'rooted in a sense of wonderment and the unknown.'

Rudolf Stingel at Sadie Coles HQ
London, 03 April 2021
Rudolf Stingel, Kirchner Wald im Winter 1925 (2021). Exhibition view: Sadie Coles HQ, 8 Bury Street, London (2021). © Rudolf Stingel. Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London. Photo: Robert Glowacki⁠.

Fostering his sublime photorealist mountainscapes, Rudolf Stingel's conceptual approach to art-making is brilliantly exemplified in this replica of the German Expressionist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner's 1925 work Wald im Winter, on view at Sadie Coles HQ. ⁠

While the vibrant pink undertones and thick gestural strokes perfectly mirror the original, on closer inspection, Stingel's characteristic interrogation of a painting's authenticity shines through.⁠

Mimosa Echard at Galerie Chantal Crousel
Paris, 02 April 2021
Mimosa Echard, Numbs (Narcisse) (2021). Aluminium frame, analogue photographic print, glass beads, plastic beads, mirrors, elastics, bracelets, synthetic hair, flower pistils, silk rope, fake flower pistils, electric cables, capsules, glass bulbs, sequin thread, pearl beads, organza, acrylic medium, acrylic lacquer, gloss. 260 x 120 x 6 cm. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Aurélien Mole. 
Mimosa Echard, Numbs (Narcisse) (2021) (detail). Aluminium frame, analogue photographic print, glass beads, plastic beads, mirrors, elastics, bracelets, synthetic hair, flower pistils, silk rope, fake flower pistils, electric cables, capsules, glass bulbs, sequin thread, pearl beads, organza, acrylic medium, acrylic lacquer, gloss. 260 x 120 x 6 cm. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Aurélien Mole. 

A recent discovery by Ocula Advisor Simon Fisher was this wonderfully atmospheric work by Mimosa Echard from her inaugural exhibition Numbs at Galerie Chantal Crousel.

Living and working in Paris, Echard's work looks to reexamine the binary between nature and technology by intermixing organic and manufactured materials through collage; a technique which closely aligns her practice with the appropriated reality and assemblage works of artists of the Nouveau Réalisme movement in 1960s Paris.⁠⁠

Park Seo-Bo at White Cube
London, 30 March 2021

The spectacular Park Seo-Bo exhibition at White Cube's Bermondsey space will open to the public on 13 April.

Seo-Bo is one of the most celebrated Korean contemporary artists and a leading figure from the Dansaekhwa movement, which included internationally renowned abstract painters Yun Hyong-keun, Kim Tschang-yeul, Chung Sang-Hwa, and Lee Ufan.

Since 1962, Seo-Bo has incorporated Korean hanji paper into his works. As he has explained in Ocula Magazine, 'hanji absorbs colour and becomes one with the paint. The Eastern view on nature disagrees with the idea of revealing oneself. Hanji absorbs everything because as a paper medium, it is rooted in this Eastern perspective.'

Images: Exhibition view: Park Seo-Bo, White Cube, London (17 March–1 May 2021). Photo: Eva Fuchs, Ocula.
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