Ocula MagazineContentsView All
Featured ContentView All
Ocula ReportFrieze Week 2018: London, Masters and 1-5412 Oct 2018 : Amah-Rose McKnight-Abrams for Ocula{{document.location.href}}
A rush of politics kicked off Frieze Week this year, with a talk between Chelsea Manning and James Bridle organised by the Institute of Contemporary Arts at the Royal Institution, three days ahead of the opening of Frieze London, Frieze Masters and 1-54 (4–7 October 2018). The event felt more like a press conference, with attendees seemingly...
{{article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('lightbox') > -1 ? 'View Lightbox' : (article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('city') > -1 ? 'View City' : (article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('video') > -1 ? 'Read More & Watch' : 'Read More'))}}
Ocula ConversationCristina Ricupero and Jörg HeiserCurators, Busan Biennale{{document.location.href}}
Divided We Stand, the tongue-in-cheek title of the 9th Busan Biennale (8 September–1 November 2018), speaks to the psychological effects of borders on individual and collective social consciousness. Co-curated by artistic directors Cristina Ricupero and Jörg Heiser, with guest curator Gahee Park, the exhibition explores the divisions haunting...
{{article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('lightbox') > -1 ? 'View Lightbox' : (article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('city') > -1 ? 'View City' : (article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('video') > -1 ? 'Read More & Watch' : 'Read More'))}}
Ocula ReportAnni Albers: In Focus6 Oct 2018 : Inga Lace for Ocula{{document.location.href}}
Walking through the Anni Albers exhibition at the K20, Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, in Düsseldorf this summer (9 June–9 September 2018), I couldn't help thinking about the 1944 poem by American dancer and artist Raymond Duncan, 'I Sing the Weaver'. The poem talks about weaving as a practice linking a weaver's body to the world; a view that...
{{article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('lightbox') > -1 ? 'View Lightbox' : (article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('city') > -1 ? 'View City' : (article.Type.toLowerCase().indexOf('video') > -1 ? 'Read More & Watch' : 'Read More'))}}

After Sang-Hwa Chung repeatedly employs the method of action consisting of “taking off/removing” and “re-painting,” small trace forms such as squares or triangles remain. This action of “formless” goes beyond the representation expression of pictorial dimension. That is, the subtle edges of the squares or triangles are created in the process of taking off the surface rather than painted directly onto the surface. They are subtle traces randomly generated in a series of “repeated” working processes as additional elements, and yet, at the same time, these vestiges are the clandestine essence of his oeuvre.

Indubitably, Chung’s work deals with the awakening of the surface, or a reduction process toward the surface, through a logical and structural procedure. As much as the artist’s simple, repeated action is consistent, the colors on which he depends are quite limited, the main focus being given to the contrast of black and white; when blue and white are treated as gradation, dark brown tints are frequently visible. His recent work is characterized by blue hues; the tension in the contrast of black and white is replaced by the convergence of bright and transparent depth. There may be a compelling correspondence between the frequent use of blue color and blue sea, which he personally experienced, having been born in a harbor city and spending his adolescent years there. The artist most likely immersed himself in the sensibility and depth of blue color, which he directly observed. The shiny reflection on the surface of the water with sunlight overlaps on the surface of Chung’s work, which appears to create peaceful riffles. The artist cultivates his dreams while contemplating the blue sea and enduring the ages from a distance of time; he now looks back on the past of his traces as a form of meditation.

From [The Surface of the Canvas as a Form of Contemplation: Sang-Hwa Chung’s Oeuvre], Kwang Su Oh (Art Critic).

Read More
{{exhibition.AltText}}{{exhibition.Status}}{{exhibition.Dates}} {{exhibition.ArtistNames}} {{exhibition.Title}}{{exhibition.GalleryLocation}}{{exhibition.GalleryTitle}}
{{gallery.AltText}}{{gallery.ArtFairBoothNo}} {{gallery.Title}}

Ocula Magazine

View All {{articles.totalResults | resultCount}}

Be the first to know when new artworks and exhibitions by Chung Sang-hwa are added to Ocula.

 

{{currentArtwork.ArtistName}}{{currentArtwork.Artist.FullName}}

{{currentArtwork.Title}}

{{currentArtwork.Medium}}{{currentArtwork.Medium && currentArtwork.Medium.substring(currentArtwork.Medium.length -1) != ',' && currentArtwork.Edition ? ',' : ''}} {{currentArtwork.Edition}}


{{currentArtwork.Signature}}


{{currentArtwork.Origin}}

Follow favourite artists and galleries, be notified of new artworks and exhibitions, use our price enquiry service and receive the Ocula newsletter. It's free.

Sign Up
 Sign Up with Facebook
By signing up you accept our Terms & Conditions, Privacy Policy and to
receiving the Ocula e-newsletter. Registration with Ocula is free.

WeChat

Scan the QR Code via WeChat to follow Ocula's official account.

iCal GoogleYahooOutlook