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Bani Abidi: ‘What you see in my films is what I know’ Ocula Conversation Bani Abidi: ‘What you see in my films is what I know’

A group of voices accompanies me in the exhibition. They are singing words I cannot comprehend, yet the warm tunes are familiar: folk songs, love songs, songs of longing. There are letters, too. They speak of the quotidian details of a soldier's life: the hardness of the war, sending money to the family, and longing for familiar landscapes, food,...

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Aichi to Okayama: Art in Japan Looks to the Future Ocula Report Aichi to Okayama: Art in Japan Looks to the Future 11 Oct 2019 : Stephanie Bailey for Ocula

There has been a flurry of triennial and biennial art activity in Japan this year. The Aichi Triennale opened in Nagoya this August, sparking a national debate about the shutting down of a display of formerly censored works—the result of public backlash against a burnt image of Emperor Hirohito and a statue commemorating the women forced into...

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Mark Bradford’s Call for Unity at Shanghai’s Long Museum Ocula Insight | Video Mark Bradford’s Call for Unity at Shanghai’s Long Museum 16 August 2019

Mark Bradford walks through Mark Bradford: Los Angeles Mark Bradford: Los Angeles at the Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai (27 July–13 October 2019) is the artist's largest solo exhibition to date in China. In this video for Ocula, Bradford and Diana Nawi, curator of the show, walk through selected works that convey the artist's concerns with...

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Jake & Dinos Chapman

United Kingdom

Related Press

Jake and Dinos Chapman: How we made 'Hell'

Kate Abbott The Guardian First published on 16 June 2015
Sixty thousand toy soldiers, chopped up, remodelled and recast. A detail from Hell. Photograph: Andy Butterton/PA.

A lot of people seem to think Hell is about the Holocaust – but it’s the absolute inverse of that. It’s the Nazis who are being subjected to industrial genocide. Which means people aren’t actually looking at it.

The idea came from chaos, the mess of our conversations, though we never really had anything to say. It’s the same idea over and over, regurgitated. We bought 60,000 toy soldiers, chopped them up, remodelled and recast them. Toy soldiers were the most inappropriate form we could think of, because they exist within the realm of play. Also, they rob death of its magnitude. We put the soldiers in nine vitrines then arranged them to form a swastika – that one was Hitler’s idea! Putting something behind glass escalates the level of voyeurism: you become implicated, just by the act of looking.

READ MORE ON theguardian.com

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