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58th Venice Biennale: May You Live In Interesting Times Ocula Report 58th Venice Biennale: May You Live In Interesting Times 24 May 2019 : Mohammad Salemy for Ocula

The 58th Venice Biennale, May You Live In Interesting Times (11 May–24 November 2019), certainly benefitted from low expectations, given the lacklustre curatorial of the previous edition, when different segments of the show were conceptually framed with titles like 'Pavilion of Joys and Fears' and 'Pavilion of Colours'. Add to this the...

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Zheng Bo Ocula Conversation Zheng Bo

Hong Kong-based artist Zheng Bo's social, ecological, and community-engaged art practice has, in recent years, focused on moving beyond a human-centred perspective to an all-inclusive, multi-species approach. He takes up marginalised plants and communities of people as subjects in his large-scale interventions, which reintroduce wildness into...

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Auckland Art Fair 2019: Conversations Extended Ocula Report Auckland Art Fair 2019: Conversations Extended 24 May 2019 : Sherry Paik for Ocula

The weather was clement for the annual Auckland Art Fair (2–5 May 2019), which was again at The Cloud on Queens Wharf. This year's edition was a get-together of 41 galleries, mostly from around Auckland and across New Zealand, with 5 spaces hailing from Sydney and the rest from Cook Islands (Bergman Gallery), Hobart (Michael Bugelli Gallery),...

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Related Press

Jake and Dinos Chapman: How we made 'Hell'

Kate Abbott The Guardian First published on 16 June 2015
Sixty thousand toy soldiers, chopped up, remodelled and recast. A detail from Hell. Photograph: Andy Butterton/PA.

A lot of people seem to think Hell is about the Holocaust – but it’s the absolute inverse of that. It’s the Nazis who are being subjected to industrial genocide. Which means people aren’t actually looking at it.

The idea came from chaos, the mess of our conversations, though we never really had anything to say. It’s the same idea over and over, regurgitated. We bought 60,000 toy soldiers, chopped them up, remodelled and recast them. Toy soldiers were the most inappropriate form we could think of, because they exist within the realm of play. Also, they rob death of its magnitude. We put the soldiers in nine vitrines then arranged them to form a swastika – that one was Hitler’s idea! Putting something behind glass escalates the level of voyeurism: you become implicated, just by the act of looking.

READ MORE ON theguardian.com

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