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Kim Tschang-Yeul: Art Without Ego Ocula Conversation Kim Tschang-Yeul: Art Without Ego

Kim Tschang-Yeul turns 90 this December, following an illustrious career that played a crucial role in bringing post-war Korean painting into the modern and contemporary art canon. Long celebrated for pensive depictions of water drops, the esteemed artist uses dual languages of abstraction and hyperrealism to articulate the psychological traumas...

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Melati Suryodarmo: Performance Art as Trigger Ocula Conversation Melati Suryodarmo: Performance Art as Trigger

In 2012, Melati Suryodarmo opened Studio Plesungan in her native Surakarta, also known as Solo, the historic royal capital of the Mataram Empire of Java in Indonesia. Suryodarmo had returned to Indonesia from Germany, where she studied Butoh and choreography with Butoh dancer and choreographer Anzu Furukawa, time-based media with avantgarde...

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In a Year of No Future: Cyberpunk at Hong Kong’s Tai Kwun Ocula Report In a Year of No Future: Cyberpunk at Hong Kong’s Tai Kwun 22 Nov 2019 : Emily Verla Bovino for Ocula

In what was reportedly Tokyo's cloudiest summer in over a century this July, Yoshiji Kigami, key animator of the cyberpunk classic Akira (1988), died in an arson attack that killed 35 people at Kyoto Animation. The attacker lit the fire with a lighter after dousing the studio with gasoline. 'They are always stealing', he explained in the belief the...

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Hans Hartung and Art Informel: Exhibition Walkthrough Ocula Insight | Video
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Hans Hartung and Art Informel: Exhibition Walkthrough 15 October 2019

Hans Hartung and Art Informel at Mazzoleni London (1 October 2019-18 January 2020) presents key works by the French-German painter while highlighting his connection with artists active in Paris during the 50s and 60s. In this video, writer and historian Alan Montgomery discusses Hartung's practice and its legacy.Born in Leipzig in 1904, Hans...

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The 32nd Bienal de São Paulo: Live Uncertainty is a collective process that began a year ago with the involvement of teachers, students, artists, activists, indigenous leaders, educators, scientists and thinkers in Brazil and abroad. But it is also a collective process that is about to begin. Curated by Jochen Volz and co-curators Gabi Ngcobo (South Africa), Júlia Rebouças (Brazil), Lars Bang Larsen (Denmark) and Sofía Olascoaga (Mexico), the exhibition will be held from September 7th to December 11th, 2016 at the Ciccillo Matarazzo Pavilion, featuring approximately 340 works by 81 artists and collectives and seeking to reflect on the possibilities offered by contemporary art to harbor and inhabit uncertainties.

Just as art unites thought and practice, reflection and action, the real wealth of Live Uncertainty will only emerge through visitors' encounter with the works, performances and public programs at the Bienal over the upcoming months.

"Today the Bienal's role is to act as a platform which actively promotes diversity, freedom and experimentation, at the same time exercising critical thought and proposing other possible realities," suggests Volz.

Eager to outline cosmological thought, environmental and collective intelligence and systemic and natural ecologies, Live Uncertainty is assembled like a garden in which themes and ideas freely intertwine into an integrated whole. It is not organized into chapters, but fundamentally based on the dialogues between different art works.

The exhibition looks to a series of historical artists who have provided a set of strategies which might appear particularly relevant today: the visual poetics of Wlademir Dias-Pino, Öyvind Fahlström's pioneering experiments with concrete poetry, Lourdes Castro's investigations of immateriality, Víctor Grippo's search for metaphysical transformations and Frans Krajcberg's continuing cry for the health of the planet, with sculptures made of coconut tree trunks and mangroves that articulate the entrance to the exhibition on the ground floor.

However, most of the artistic projects were commissioned specifically for the 32nd Bienal, not to illustrate a theoretical or thematic framework, but to expand the creative principles of uncertainty in many different directions.

32ND BIENAL DE SÃO PAULO - INCERTEZA VIVA [LIVE UNCERTAINTY]

September 7 to December 11, 2016 
Tue, Wed, Fri, Sun and holidays: 9am - 7pm (last entry 6pm)
Thur, Sat: 9am - 10pm (last entry 9pm)
Closed on Mondays
Free admission

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