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Ocula ReportIranian Art at LACMA: In the Fields of Empty Days12 Jun 2018 : Perwana Nazif for Ocula{{document.location.href}}
In the Fields of Empty Days: The Intersection of Past and Present in Iranian Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA, 6 May–9 September 2018), explores 'the continuous and inescapable presence of the past in Iranian society.' Curated by Linda Komaroff, curator of Islamic art and head of LACMA's Art of the Middle East department, the...
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Ocula ConversationLaure Prouvost{{document.location.href}}
Laure Prouvost's most recent exhibition in New York at Lisson Gallery (9 March–14 April 2018) was a gesamtkunstwerk of sorts. The show spread through the entire 10th Avenue gallery space and included two years of artistic production: installation, sculpture, painting, textile, sound and moving image. Uncle's Travel Agency Franchise, Deep Travel...
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Ocula ReportDak’Art Biennale 2018: The Red Hour1 Jun 2018 : Federica Bueti for Ocula{{document.location.href}}
On my last evening in Dakar, I made my way to Yarakh, a neighbourhood on the eastern side of the Senegalese capital, where I was guided down a narrow sandy path toward a beach where a group of actors, artists, and locals were taking part in or attending the performance Xeex Bi Du Jeex (a luta continua). The play was written collaboratively in 2018...
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From the 1950s onwards, Ken Price committed to clay as a material and was a key figure in the rising Los Angeles art scene. His small-scale brightly coloured ceramic sculptures have been equally inspired by ancient Mexican earthenware, traditional folk pottery and the Bauhaus fusion of crafts and fine arts. Developing high craftsmanship, he handmade very different series of abstract and biomorphic forms imbued with suggestive associations. In the 1970s, he moved to Taos in New Mexico where he produced the ambitious series called Happy’s Curios that includes various display devices like death shrines and town units. He spent the 1980s in Massachusetts, and moved back to Los Angeles and New Mexico in 1992. Price often fired his sculptural objects (sometimes functional vessels) unglazed, which he then painted with multiple, thin layers of colour. These were often sanded to produce a variegated effect. He also worked as a printmaker.

Ken Price had his first solo exhibition at the Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, in 1960. In 1979 and 1981, he participated in the Whitney Biennial. His first retrospective took place in 1992 at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis. A major travelling retrospective was organised by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2012-2013 and designed by his friend Frank Gehry. He exhibited with Xavier Hufkens for the first time in 2007.

Ken Price was born in Los Angeles, USA, in 1935. He died in New Mexico in 2012.

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