Advisory Picks

Advisory Picks presents artworks by artists who have captured the attention of our advisory team.

Find in Advisory Picks

Ithell Colquhoun: Flesh and Form
12 June 2024 | Exhibitions
Ithell Colquhoun: Flesh and Form 1
Exhibition view: Ithell Colquhoun, Elemental, Ben Hunter, London (31 May–26 July 2024). Courtesy Ben Hunter, London. Photo: Jack Elliot Edwards.
Ithell Colquhoun: Flesh and Form 2
Exhibition view: Ithell Colquhoun, Elemental, Ben Hunter, London (31 May–26 July 2024). Courtesy Ben Hunter, London. Photo: Jack Elliot Edwards.
Ithell Colquhoun: Flesh and Form 3
Ithell Colquhoun, Alcove I (1946). Oil on board. 22.9 x 34.3 cm. Courtesy Ben Hunter, London. Photo: Jack Elliot Edwards.
Ithell Colquhoun: Flesh and Form 4
Ithell Colquhoun, Alcove II (1948). Oil on board. 22.9 x 34.3 cm. Courtesy Ben Hunter, London. Photo: Jack Elliot Edwards.
Ithell Colquhoun: Flesh and Form 5
Exhibition view: Ithell Colquhoun, Elemental, Ben Hunter, London (31 May–26 July 2024). Courtesy Ben Hunter, London. Photo: Jack Elliot Edwards.
Ithell Colquhoun: Flesh and Form 6
Exhibition view: Ithell Colquhoun, Elemental, Ben Hunter, London (31 May–26 July 2024). Courtesy Ben Hunter, London. Photo: Jack Elliot Edwards.

Ithell Colquhoun's paintings, with their fecund, fleshy forms, are deliberately ambiguous and transfixing.

Ovary-like shapes and unusual growths covered in capillaries drift across craggy landscapes. In Gorgon (1946), forms reminiscent of fallopian tubes and clusters of polyps emerge, while in Alcove I (1946), a cavernous space in shades of blood-red and pink evokes the image of a vulva.

A member of the British Surrealist Group, Colquhoun was active in the movement until 1940, when her involvement with occultism led to her departure. Deeply interested in mysticism, feminist magical practices, and symbolism, she drew inspiration from alchemy, tarot, and mythology to create uncanny paintings often representing female fertility.

Since Tate acquired her archive of more than 5000 works in 2019, Colquhoun has gained increased recognition for her significant contributions to 20th-century art. At Ben Hunter in London, a selection of her paintings is on view in the exhibition Elemental from 31 May to 26 July 2024.

Featured works include Alcove I (1946) and Alcove II (1948), vulva-like spaces with fleshy, veiny walls housing blue, green, and yellow growths, and Volcanic Landscape (1969), a trippy vision of a marbled terrain, where colours bleed and swirl in psychedelic patterns.

Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World
23 May 2024 | Exhibitions
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 1
Exhibition view: Judy Chicago, Revelations, Serpentine Galleries, London (23 May–1 September 2024). © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Serpentine Galleries, London. Photo: Jo Underhill.
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 2
Exhibition view: Judy Chicago, Revelations, Serpentine Galleries, London (23 May–1 September 2024). © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Serpentine Galleries, London. Photo: Jo Underhill.
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 3
Judy Chicago, Wrestling with the Shadow for Her Life from Shadow Drawings (1982). Prismacolour on rag paper. 73.66 x 58.42 cm. © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Serpentine Galleries, London. Photo: © Donald Woodman.
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 4
Judy Chicago, Peeling Back (1974). Offset Photo-lithograph on rag paper. 72.39 x 55.88 cm.
© Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Serpentine Galleries, London. Photo: © Donald Woodman.
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 5
Exhibition view: Judy Chicago, Revelations, Serpentine Galleries, London (23 May–1 September 2024). © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Serpentine Galleries, London. Photo: Jo Underhill.
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 6
Exhibition view: Judy Chicago, Revelations, Serpentine Galleries, London (23 May–1 September 2024). © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Serpentine Galleries, London. Photo: Jo Underhill.
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 7
Judy Chicago, Smoke Bodies from Women and Smoke (1971–1972). Film (still). Remastered in 2016 Original Total Running Time: 25:31. Edited to 14:45 by Salon 94, NY 2017. © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Judy Chicago’s Fertile Feminist World 8
Judy Chicago, In the Beginning from Birth Project (1982) (detail). Prismacolor on paper. 165.1 x 988.06 cm. © Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © Donald Woodman.

Judy Chicago, a spearhead in feminist art, has devoted decades to celebrating the female experience.

Born Judith Cohen, she legally changed her surname to Chicago in 1970—an act asserting her independence from marital or ancestral ties and a nod to her birthplace.

During her studies at UCLA in the 1960s, she responded to the male-dominated art world by dedicating herself to an artistic practice centred on her belief that the 'female experience could be construed to be every bit as central to the larger human condition as is the male'.

'I left L.A. to start to try and figure out how to create a feminist art practice and to start working with young women in the hopes of helping them be able to make art where they didn't have to deny their gender like I did,' the artist told Ocula Magazine.

Now, at 84 years old, she opens her retrospective, Revelations (23 May–1 September 2024), at London's Serpentine North Gallery.

The exhibition features rarely seen drawings, paintings, sketchbooks, photographs, and films, along with a manuscript written by Chicago in the early 1970s, which is being shown publicly for the first time. Bearing the same title as the exhibition, the manuscript, which the artist produced while creating her seminal work The Dinner Party (1974–1979), is Chicago's retelling of history imagining a fair and equal world.

Serpentine North is filled with works that flaunt Chicago's distinctive psychedelic style. Among them are paintings depicting women giving birth, such as In the Beginning, from Birth Project (1982), characterised by colourful ombre shades contrasted with white outlines that appear to glow against a black backdrop.

Abstract flower works, like Peeling Back (1974), hint at vulva imagery, emerging from rippling patterns that create the illusion they are pulsating. While films and photographs like Smoke Bodies from Women and Smoke (1971–1972) portray goddess-like figures enveloped in multi-coloured clouds of smoke, which soften the rugged California landscape surrounding them.

Isaac Julien’s Ode to Frederick Douglass Shows at MoMA
22 May 2024 | Exhibitions
Isaac Julien’s Ode to Frederick Douglass Shows at MoMA 1
Exhibition view: Isaac Julien, Lessons of the Hour, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (19 May–28 September 28 2024). Photo: Emile Askey.
Isaac Julien’s Ode to Frederick Douglass Shows at MoMA 2
Exhibition view: Isaac Julien, Lessons of the Hour, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (19 May–28 September 28 2024). Photo: Emile Askey.
Isaac Julien’s Ode to Frederick Douglass Shows at MoMA 3
Exhibition view: Isaac Julien, Lessons of the Hour, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (19 May–28 September 28 2024). Photo: Emile Askey.
Isaac Julien’s Ode to Frederick Douglass Shows at MoMA 4
Exhibition view: Isaac Julien, Lessons of the Hour, The Museum of Modern Art, New York (19 May–28 September 28 2024). Photo: Emile Askey.

Escaping from slavery in 1838, Frederick Douglass emerged as a key figure in the abolitionist movement. His powerful speeches and influential writings garnered widespread attention, making him one of his era's most photographed American men and an important advocate for social justice.

Isaac Julien pays tribute to Douglass in his exhibition Lessons of the Hour, which is showing at The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) from 19 May to 28 September 2024. The exhibition features Julien's film installation of the same name, which was recently collected by the museum.

On view in a red-carpeted, dimly lit room, the 10-screen video installation explores Douglass's life and legacy. Through historical reenactments and excerpts from the abolitionist's speeches, writings, and letters, Julien invites viewers to reflect on the significance of Douglass's moral and political views.

Although previously shown at the National Galleries Scotland and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among others, this is the first time the work is being shown with related artefacts.

These include portraits of Douglass, pamphlets of his speeches, first editions of his memoirs, and a facsimile of a rare manuscript on his ideas about photography displayed in a room with wallpaper made from period newspaper clippings, magazine illustrations, and scrapbook pages.

In conversation with Ocula in 2014, Julien discussed his desire to create work that incorporates intellectual ideas from historical, cultural, and artistic theory, while also transcending them.

'The challenge is to make a work that brings spectators to see it and speaks to an audience, and at the same time gets one to think about the issues the work raises,' he said.

Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube
15 May 2024 | Exhibitions
Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube 1
Exhibition view: Danica Lundy, Boombox, White Cube Mason's Yard, London (15 May–29 June 2024). © Danica Lundy. Courtesy White Cube, London. Photo: Ollie Hammick.
Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube 2
Exhibition view: Danica Lundy, Boombox, White Cube Mason's Yard, London (15 May–29 June 2024). © Danica Lundy. Courtesy White Cube, London. Photo: Ollie Hammick.
Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube 3
Danica Lundy, I like the boys and the boys like me (2023). Oil on canvas. 188.0 x 121.9 cm. © Danica Lundy. Courtesy White Cube, London. Photo: © David Westwood.
Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube 4
Danica Lundy, Bowery ballroom II (2024). Oil and pencil on canvas. 243.8 x 182.9 cm. © Danica Lundy. Courtesy White Cube, London. Photo: © David Westwood.
Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube 5
Exhibition view: Danica Lundy, Boombox, White Cube Mason's Yard, London (15 May–29 June 2024). © Danica Lundy. Courtesy White Cube, London. Photo: Ollie Hammick.
Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube 6
Exhibition view: Danica Lundy, Boombox, White Cube Mason's Yard, London (15 May–29 June 2024). © Danica Lundy. Courtesy White Cube, London. Photo: Ollie Hammick.
Danica Lundy Turns Inside Out at White Cube 7
Danica Lundy, Pour (2024). Oil on canvas. 274.3 x 213.4 cm. © Danica Lundy. Courtesy White Cube, London. Photo: © David Westwood.

In Danica Lundy's painting Pour (2024), viewers find themselves peering out at a disjointed world from within their own mouths. We look out over our meatless rib cage at knobbly knees in tight shorts. Our teeth loom before us, the upper row suspended high above the lower, appearing huge beside female athletes on a grassy field. We take a drink of water, which comes straight at us, cascading down our transparent throat.

One might wonder: why adopt such a grotesque perspective for a portrait? Is it to challenge our conventional understanding of reality and perception? Or perhaps to get us thinking about the relationship between our inner selves and the external world?

The Canadian artist conjures a hyperreal presence within her paintings by manipulating familiar shapes—distorting, inverting, and amplifying them.

Through the use of odd proportions, unusual perspectives, and the merging of forms, she creates uncanny visual portraits where we can see everything at once. Her work offers viewers a glimpse into worlds where reality bends in unexpected ways, allowing us to see from somewhere other than our own eyes.

Pour, along with a collection of other new paintings, is on view at White Cube Mason's Yard as part of Lundy's exhibition, Boombox, which is on view in London from 15 May to 29 June 2024.

Jenny Holzer Lets the Light In at the Guggenheim
15 May 2024 | Exhibitions
Jenny Holzer Lets the Light In at the Guggenheim 1
Exhibition view: Jenny Holzer, Light Line, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (17 May–29 September 2024). © Jenny Holzer, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. Photo: Filip Wolak.
Jenny Holzer Lets the Light In at the Guggenheim 2
Exhibition view: Jenny Holzer, Light Line, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (17 May–29 September 2024). © Jenny Holzer, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. Photo: Ariel Ione Williams.
Jenny Holzer Lets the Light In at the Guggenheim 3
Jenny Holzer, Untitled (Selections from Truisms, Inflammatory Essays, The Living Series, The Survival Series, Under a Rock, Laments, and Child Text) (1989). Extended helical tricolor L.E.D. electronic-display signboard. Site-specific dimensions. © Jenny Holzer. Courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photo: David Heald.
Jenny Holzer Lets the Light In at the Guggenheim 4
Jenny Holzer installing Untitled (Selections from Truisms, Inflammatory Essays, The Living Series, The Survival Series, Under a Rock, Laments, and Child Text) (1989). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. Photo: Michele Perel.
Jenny Holzer Lets the Light In at the Guggenheim 5
Exhibition view: Jenny Holzer, Light Line, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (17 May–29 September 2024). © Jenny Holzer, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. Photo: Filip Wolak.
Jenny Holzer Lets the Light In at the Guggenheim 6
Exhibition view: Jenny Holzer, Light Line, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (17 May–29 September 2024). © Jenny Holzer, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York. Photo: Ariel Ione Williams.

In 1989, Jenny Holzer graffitied the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum's six-story spiral interior with LED signs displaying provocative texts. Today, the New York museum presents a recreation of the iconic installation, which features scrolling words and statements from Holzer's 'Truisms' (1978–1987) and 'Inflammatory Essays' (1979–1982) series.

Titled Light Line (17 May–29 September 2024), the exhibition sees Holzer resurrecting old phrases while introducing new ones, including some generated by artificial intelligence. Teasingly, Holzer doesn't let us know which ones are hers.

AI or not, the phrases provoke thoughts on themes spanning feminism, violence, oppression, and vulnerability.

Accompanying the main installation are a selection of the artist's paintings, works on paper, and stone pieces from the 1970s to present.

Also, from 16 to 20 May, Holzer's light projection For the Guggenheim (2008–ongoing) will illuminate the museum's façade at sundown.

Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM
9 May 2024 | Exhibitions
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 1
Exhibition view: Francesca Mollett, Corso, GRIMM, New York (10 May–22 June 2024). Courtesy GRIMM.
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 2
Exhibition view: Francesca Mollett, Corso, GRIMM, New York (10 May–22 June 2024). Courtesy GRIMM.
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 3
Francesca Mollett, Nymph of the hinge (2023–2024). Oil on linen. 230 x 180 cm. Courtesy the artist and GRIMM, New York. Photo: Peter Mallet.
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 4
Francesca Mollett, Ravel (2023). Oil on linen. 230 x 180 cm. Courtesy the artist and GRIMM, New York. Photo: Peter Mallet.
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 5
Exhibition view: Francesca Mollett, Corso, GRIMM, New York (10 May–22 June 2024). Courtesy GRIMM.
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 6
Exhibition view: Francesca Mollett, Corso, GRIMM, New York (10 May–22 June 2024). Courtesy GRIMM.
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 7
Francesca Mollett, Bonding (2024). Oil on linen. 230 x 180 cm. Courtesy the artist and GRIMM, New York. Photo: Peter Mallet.
Francesca Mollett’s Shifting Surfaces at GRIMM 8
Francesca Mollett, Spindle (2024). Oil on linen. 250 x 180 cm. Courtesy the artist and GRIMM, New York. Photo: Peter Mallet.

Francesca Mollett's paintings are distinguished by their intricate surfaces, which are built up with layers of oil and acrylic paint, both wet and dry. The addition of thick impasto strokes adds volume, while marks from a palette knife reveal different layers of paint. This technique results in segments that resemble collages, with different colours and textures interspersed across the canvas.

While New York's spring art fairs are in full swing, the Bristol-born artist opens her solo exhibition at GRIMM's 54 White Street location. Corso (10 May–22 June 2024) features Mollett's recent paintings and explores the idea that a painting's surface can appear dynamic—the imagery beneath occasionally emerges distinctly, only to fade away at other moments.

The works on view look at themes of growth and change, and mimic organic processes found in nature. For example, in Bonding (2024) crystalline surfaces seemingly break apart, evolving into fragmented rocks and powdery residue. Similarly, Spindle (2024) depicts the emergence of weed-like or mossy forms from cracks in pavements or building walls.

Mollett's paintings reveal ambiguous forms that seem to grow, stretch, seep, and warp amid unstable planes. With so much textural detail to navigate, her paintings urge viewers to engage with them slowly and reflectively.

Discussing the exhibition, GRIMM founder Jorg Grimm expressed, 'Francesca and I have been planning this New York solo show since we first presented her works as part of Tom Morton's curated show The Kingfisher's Wing in 2022. Now that Corso is installed at the gallery, there's a tremendous sense of accomplishment and the reactions to the paintings have been rightfully overwhelming.'

The exhibition will be followed by Mollett's forthcoming solo show at The Warehouse Dallas in spring 2025.

Matthew Brown Inaugurates New York Gallery with TARWUK
3 May 2024 | Galleries
Matthew Brown Inaugurates New York Gallery with TARWUK 1
TARWUK, MRTISKLAAH_.selcatceps dem- mir-dlog hguorht maelg stekcos- eye sih dna ,lluks a sah eh daeh a fo daetsnI (2024). Acrylic, oil, pastel and pencil on canvas. 243.8 x 182.9 cm. Courtesy Matthew Brown. Photo: Dan Bradica Studio.
Matthew Brown Inaugurates New York Gallery with TARWUK 2
TARWUK,
MRTISKLAAHMRTISKLAAH_( .niaga krad si moor ehT .tuo seog dna ,dnah s'HTIDE morf sllaf eldnac ehT) (2024). Acrylic, oil, pastel and pencil on canvas. 243.8 x 182.9 cm. Courtesy Matthew Brown. Photo: Dan Bradica Studio.
Matthew Brown Inaugurates New York Gallery with TARWUK 3
TARWUK, (.deb eht no gninael stis dna roolf eht no eldnac eht stup ehS .hctam a sekirts HTIDE (2024). Watercolour and pencil on paper. 29.5 x 20.6 cm. Framed: 38.1 x 30.5 cm. Courtesy Matthew Brown. Photo: Dan Bradica Studio.
Matthew Brown Inaugurates New York Gallery with TARWUK 4
TARWUK, .abut sih ni swolb ,stips __NOYMES (2024).
Watercolour, pencil and coloured pencil on paper. 29.5 x 21 cm. Framed:
38.1 x 30.5 cm. Courtesy Matthew Brown. Photo: Dan Bradica Studio.
Matthew Brown Inaugurates New York Gallery with TARWUK 5
TARWUK,
KLOSKLAS_'!relloT tsnrE ,th- gin dooG' (2024).
Mixed media. 238.8 x 139.7 x 401.3 cm. Courtesy Matthew Brown. Photo: Dan Bradica Studio.
Matthew Brown Inaugurates New York Gallery with TARWUK 6
TARWUK, KLOSKLAS_100setagorruS (2024). Mixed media. 182.9 x 144.8 x 149.9 cm. Dimensions variable. Courtesy Matthew Brown. Photo: Dan Bradica Studio.

Advised by veteran gallerist Jeffrey Deitch over coffee in 2019, Matthew Brown, at just 23, opened his first gallery down the road from Deitch on North La Brea Avenue in Hollywood.

A second space across the street popped up shortly after as his tightly curated, and now highly coveted, programme grew to include the likes of Sedrick Chisom, Sasha Gordon, and Kenturah Davis.⁠

Now, the young gallerist set his sights further afield, 390 Broadway to be precise, on the ground floor of a building that formerly housed Jasmin Tsou's JTT.

The new venture opens with Good night, Ernst Toller! (29 April–15 June 2024), a solo exhibition by TARWUK, the artistic collaboration of Ivana Vukšić (b. 1981, Dubrovnik, Croatia) and Bruno Pogacnik Tremow (b. 1981, Zagreb).

An ode to the 20th-century German playwright Ernst Toller, the exhibition features new paintings, and sculptures that document the artists' recent explorations in theatre and performance.

The opening marks the second collaboration between TARWUK and Brown, following the artists' 2021 exhibition A Musical Score at the End of the World.

On reports of a recent wave of New York gallery closures, namely Tribeca's Denny Gallery and Chinatown's Foxy Production, Matthew Brown is bucking the trend—expanding his scope to include a Manhattan space when perhaps others, for various reasons, are shying away.

Superstar Painter Joseph Yaeger Joins Modern Art
24 April 2024 | Galleries
Superstar Painter Joseph Yaeger Joins Modern Art 1
Photo: © William Waterworth.
Superstar Painter Joseph Yaeger Joins Modern Art 2
Photo: © William Waterworth.
Superstar Painter Joseph Yaeger Joins Modern Art 3
Photo: © William Waterworth.
Superstar Painter Joseph Yaeger Joins Modern Art 4
Photo: © William Waterworth.

You may find Joseph Yaeger celebrating tonight at St JOHN, his favourite London restaurant, after the announcement that the Montana-born painter has joined Stuart Shave's London gallery.

Modern Art is fast becoming one of the leading galleries in the capital, with Yaeger the latest in a run of outstanding painters, including Justin Caguiat, Andrew Cranston, and Mohammed Sami, the gallery has taken on in recent years.

Ocula Director Rory Mitchell was first introduced to Yaeger's work in After Image (2020), a group exhibition at Mamoth in London curated by Robert Spragg.

Since then, his paintings of bulging gesso, swathes of watercolour, and discerningly selected subject matter have been a source of intrigue, joy, and comfort when encountered at exhibitions and art fairs, including the three small paintings we saw at Frieze Seoul.

In 2022, Ocula contributor Will Hine visited Yaeger's studio in East London to discuss his approach to unearthing new subject matter, depicting heightened emotional states, and using watercolour on gesso-primed linen to guide his way of seeing.

'I think there is a kind of method acting involved when I paint,' Yaeger explained. 'I probably do manipulate my own face and try to get into what emotional state the people in the paintings are experiencing and heighten it as much as possible to get that overture, good-cry feeling, which is indistinguishable from happiness or sadness.'

Gesso 'incidents' are the foundation of Yaeger's canvases, to which he applies thin washes of watercolour that seep into every groove and crevice. The artist will spray water onto the drying gesso from a height in a looping motion that permeates the surface creating crater-like forms.

The sides of Yaeger's canvases are masterpieces in themselves, often bulging with gesso or the remnants of a past painting which—like many Old Master paintings—have been replaced with bigger and brighter ideas.

Modern Art's announcement follows a busy run for the London-based artist who has received a great deal of attention since receiving his MA in painting from London's Royal College of Art in 2019.

Last year Yaeger had knock-out shows in London, at both The Perimeter and the East London gallery Project Native Informant. A solo exhibition at Modern Art is yet to be announced.

Terry Winters Mimics Murmurations at Matthew Marks Gallery
23 April 2024 | Exhibitions
Terry Winters Mimics Murmurations at Matthew Marks Gallery 1
Exhibition view: Terry Winters, Point Cloud Pictures, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York (1 May–29 June 2024). © Terry Winters. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York.
Terry Winters Mimics Murmurations at Matthew Marks Gallery 2
Exhibition view: Terry Winters, Point Cloud Pictures, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York (1 May–29 June 2024). © Terry Winters. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York.
Terry Winters Mimics Murmurations at Matthew Marks Gallery 3
Exhibition view: Terry Winters, Point Cloud Pictures, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York (1 May–29 June 2024). © Terry Winters. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York.
Terry Winters Mimics Murmurations at Matthew Marks Gallery 4
Exhibition view: Terry Winters, Point Cloud Pictures, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York (1 May–29 June 2024). © Terry Winters. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York.
Terry Winters Mimics Murmurations at Matthew Marks Gallery 5
Terry Winters, Point Cloud (4) (2023). Oil, wax, and resin on linen. 211 x 160 cm. © Terry Winters. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York.

Terry Winters' paintings suggest an advanced mathematical diagram or plant cells under a microscope.

No matter what comes to mind, they affirm the American artist's brilliance for reimagining existing imagery through abstract painting.

Winters' exhibition, Point Cloud Pictures (1 May–29 June 2024), takes place at Matthew Marks Gallery's 523 West 24th Street location in New York. The show brings together new paintings on linen and paper in time for Frieze New York 2024 (1–5 May 2024).

The paintings take inspiration from three-dimensional modelling and point clouds—sets of data points in space often used to represent a 3D shape or object.

Winters' 'Point Cloud' paintings envision ever-expanding depths, where multifaceted forms morph, expand, overlap, and pulsate. These abstract patterns, which appear as floating grid-like structures, are given zest and depth through vibrant pigment built up over layers of oil, resin, and wax.

In Point Cloud (4) (2023), Winters paints a series of crimson spots against a backdrop of deep blue. The interplay of these dots, varying in size and angle, creates the illusion of three-dimensionality. The amorphous arrangement conjures a flock of birds in murmuration, manoeuvring through a twilight sky.

Joan Semmel Subverts Stereotypes with Her Own Body
23 April 2024 | Exhibitions
Joan Semmel Subverts Stereotypes with Her Own Body 1
Joan Semmel, Baroque (2002). Oil on canvas. 106.7 x 152.4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels. Photo: Jeffrey Sturges.
Joan Semmel Subverts Stereotypes with Her Own Body 2
Joan Semmel, Yellow Sky (2015). Oil on canvas. 129.5 x 180.3 cm. Courtesy the artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels. Photo: Jeffrey Sturges.
Joan Semmel Subverts Stereotypes with Her Own Body 3
Joan Semmel, Turning (2018). Oil on canvas. 182.9 x 152.4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels. Photo: Jeffrey Sturges.

At 91, New York-born artist Joan Semmel continues to challenge prevailing depictions of women's bodies. Since the 1970s, the American artist has focused on figuration, using her own body as the subject to offer a non-objectifying stance of the female form.

A selection of Semmel's paintings spanning five decades is on view at Xavier Hufkens' Van Eyck location in Brussels. Titled An Other View (25 April–15 June 2024), the exhibition coincides with the 40th edition of Art Brussels and marks Semmel's first solo show in Europe since 1969.

On view are eight of Semmel's larger-than-life oil paintings on canvas along with two works on paper. Spanning 1971 to 2018, the works extend visitors a moment to consider the artist's evolving portrayal of the female nude form, its natural ageing, and its intersection with developing feminist issues.

Vivid and sensual, the paintings depict tightly cropped nudes with abstract colouring.

Semmel's face is intentionally hidden in much of her work. It is behind a camera in Baroque (2002), for instance, and cropped out of frame in Turning (2018) and Yellow Sky (2015).

Semmel's compositions are provocative and tender. She paints close-ups of her breasts, bottom, and belly true to form but in intense colours like lime green or orange-red.

Her representations don't subscribe to the standardised images of women's bodies, rather they speak to the imperfections of the human body with authenticity and originality.

In February 2024, Semmel's painting Hold Tight (1973) sold for just over U.S. $4 million at Fair Warning, a private online auction platform. This sale more than doubled the artist's auction record to date.

No results found.
Ocula discover the best in contemporary art icon.
Get Access
Join Ocula to request price and availability of artworks, exhibition price lists and build a collection of favourite artists, galleries and artworks.
Do you have an Ocula account? Login
What best describes your interest in art?

Subscribe to our newsletter for upcoming exhibitions, available works, events and more.
By clicking Sign Up or Continue with Facebook or Google, you agree to Ocula's Terms & Conditions. Your personal data is held in accordance with our Privacy Policy.
Thank you for joining us. Just one more thing...
Soon you will receive an email asking you to complete registration. If you do not receive it then you can check and edit the email address you entered.
Close
Thank you for joining us.
You can now request price and availability of artworks, exhibition price lists and build a collection of favourite artists, galleries and artworks.
Close
Welcome back to Ocula
Enter your email address and password below to login.
Reset Password
Enter your email address to receive a password reset link.
Reset Link Sent
We have sent you an email containing a link to reset your password. Simply click the link and enter your new password to complete this process.
Login