Advisory Picks

Advisory Picks presents artworks by artists who have captured the attention of our advisory team.

Find in Advisory Picks

Francis Picabia's 'Femme nue devant la glace' Stands Out at Art Basel
Basel, 22 September 2021

Francis Picabia's Femme nue devant la glace is a definite standout at Art Basel.

Picabia's figure seems to catch your gaze from every angle. While painted on board laid down on canvas—which is actually quite common for paintings from Picabia's 'Portrait de femme' series—the work feels more impressively substantial in scale compared to others in the series. ⁠⁠

A first-day favourite of Rory's. Showing with David Zwirner.

Basquiat's 'Tuxedo' Among Art Basel Highlights
Basel, 22 September 2021
Jean-Michel Basquiat, Tuxedo (1982). Photo: Simon Fisher.
Jean-Michel Basquiat, Tuxedo (1982). Photo: Simon Fisher.

This large-scale silkscreen work Tuxedo (1982) is a favourite of Simon Fisher's from Art Basel's opening day, showing with Van de Weghe Fine Art.

One of nine silkscreens remaining from Jean-Michel Basquiat's iconic 'Tuxedo' series, this work is particularly cool when read in the context of the 1980s New York art scene. ⁠⁠

Having been asked to present a work in the New York gallerist Tony Shafrazi's 1983 exhibition Champions, Basquiat's submission of Tuxedo was swiftly rejected in the expectation that he was going to exhibit a painting.

In response, Basquiat hand-painted marks straight onto the silkscreen. His subsequent acceptance into the exhibition with this 'painting' not only placed his work at an important point in history—being the first survey of an emerging generation of artists/street artists in an established New York gallery—but also marked his unique voice in downtown hip-hop culture in the early 1980s. ⁠⁠

Genre-Defining Female Artists in Basel
Basel, 20 September 2021
Elizabeth Peyton, Greta (2019). Oil on board, 43.2 x 35.6 x 2.9 cm. Peter Morton, Los Angeles. © Elizabeth Peyton. Courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.
Alice Neel, Harold Cruse, CA (1950). Oil on canvas. 78.7 x 55.9 cm. Private collection. © The Estate of Alice Neel. Courtesy The Estate of Alice Neel and David Zwirner.
Marlene Dumas, Teeth (2018). Oil on canvas. 40 x 30 cm. Private Collection, Madrid⁠⁠ © Marlene Dumas. Courtesy the Artist and David Zwirner Photo: Kerry McFate⁠⁠

In Basel this week? Don't miss Close Up at Fondation Beyeler, on view until 2 January 2022. ⁠⁠

This major exhibition surveys genre-defining female artists working from the beginnings of modernism in 1870, up until the present day—a rare opportunity to see works by some of the most influential figurative painters and photographers of the last 150 years in close dialogue. ⁠⁠

Close Up focuses on 'the 'artists' gaze, on their personal vision of their surroundings that finds expression in the portraits of themselves and others.'⁠⁠

Including artists such as Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt, Paula Modersohn-Becker, Lotte Laserstein, Frida Kahlo, Alice Neel, Marlene Dumas, Cindy Sherman, and Elizabeth Peyton, the show features many iconic works sourced from private collections that rarely come to public view. ⁠⁠

Three Highly Anticipated Exhibitions Open at Goldsmiths CCA
London, 18 September 2021
Olivia Sterling, Trifling (2020). Acrylic on canvas. 100 x 100 cm. Courtesy the artist.
Eugenio Dittborn, Coudre Provisoirement a Long Points, Airmail Painting No. 183 (2011–2012). Courtesy Alexander and Bonin, New York. Photo: Jorge Brantmeyer⁠⁠.

On Friday 17 September, London's Goldsmiths Centre for Contemporary Art opened three highly anticipated autumn exhibitions: Olivia Sterling: Really Rough Scrubbing Brush; Sam Keogh: Sated Soldier; Sated Peasant, Sated Scribe; and Eugenio Dittborn: Airmail Paintings.

Led by curator Sarah McCrory, the gallery has carved a distinguished reputation for finding and nurturing young talent in addition to rediscovering both artists and broader historical movements since its conception in 2018.⁠⁠

For instance, since her solo exhibition last year, Sophie Barber has now shown with Alison Jacques Gallery and Chris Sharp, and Lindsey Mendick, who also exhibited last year, has now found representation with Carl Freedman Gallery. Their 2019 exhibition How Chicago! Imagists 1960s & 70s played a key role in a market rediscovery of the surreal and political painting movement. ⁠⁠

Donald Judd Foundation Switches Representation from David Zwirner to Gagosian
New York, 17 September 2021
Donald Judd in his architecture studio, Marfa, Texas, 1993. Artwork © 2021 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: © Laura Wilson⁠⁠.

The Donald Judd Foundation has announced a switch in its sole representation from David Zwirner to Gagosian, marking another major shift in artist transfer between the mega galleries. ⁠⁠

In the announcement, Judd's son and Artistic Director of the Judd Foundation explained, 'We have been getting busier and bigger and it was time to make a change,' while Larry Gagosian added, 'It is impossible to consider the history of American art without Donald Judd. He is one of the first artists whose work I really admired'.⁠⁠

The legacy of the sculptor's work has moved from strength to strength in recent years. In 2020, for instance, there were ten solo exhibitions dedicated to the artist in the United States, including an acclaimed retrospective at MoMA, curated by Ann Tempkin.⁠⁠

Reviewing the exhibition in The New York Times, Holland Cotter mused, 'His art once thought to be too severe to be beautiful (or maybe to be art at all) can now be seen to offer pleasures, visual and conceptual, that any audience with open eyes, can relate to.'⁠⁠

Tobias Pils and Joe Bradley Join Forces at Capitain Petzel
Berlin, 16 September 2021
Tobias Pils, The Rest (2021). Oil on canvas. 230 x 198 cm. Courtesy Capitain Petzel. 
Joe Bradley, Passenger (2021). Oil on canvas. 178 x 190.5 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Capitain Petzel

Friends and artists Tobias Pils and Joe Bradley have come together to produce a spectacular joint exhibition now showing at the Berlin-based gallery Capitain Petzel. ⁠⁠

The combination of Bradley's explosive and colourful abstract paintings against Pils' grayscale narrative works, along with a collection of works on paper by both artists, make for a wonderful show. ⁠

Avery Singer's Apocalyptic Works at Hauser & Wirth
New York, 15 September 2021
Avery Singer, China Chalet (2021). Acrylic on canvas stretched over wood panel, 254.6 x 305.4 x 5.4 cm. Courtesy the artist, Hauser & Wirth, and Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin © Avery Singer Photo: Lance Brewer.⁠⁠
Avery Singer, Sculptor (2021). Acrylic on canvas stretched over wood panel. 241.9 x 216.5 x 5.3 cm. Courtesy the artist, Hauser & Wirth, and Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin. © Avery Singer. Photo: Lance Brewer.⁠⁠

Avery Singer's (b. 1987) first solo exhibition with Hauser & Wirth has opened at their New York location. ⁠⁠

Singer's distinctive paintings utilise industrial automation, three-dimensional computer modelling software, and traditional painting techniques.⁠⁠

Titled Reality Ender, the apocalyptic works draw on disparate contemporary iconography: JUUL Pods; Wojak Memes; and China Chalet, a now-closed New York dim sum restaurant and legendary queer nightlife mecca.⁠⁠

Larger-scale paintings are priced at $1.2million. As Nate Freeman has noted in Vanity Fair, 'at just 34, Singer remains the most expensive millennial artist on earth'.

Clay Pop in New York Showcases a Medium of the Moment
New York, 13 September 2021
Ruby Neri, Clay Pop (2021). Ceramic, glaze. 116.8 x 91.4 x 78.7 cm. Courtesy the artist and Salon 94, New York. Photo: Joshua White.
Melvino Garretti, A Wonderful Life (2020). Low-fire ceramic with glazes⁠⁠. 27.94 x 24.13 x 25.4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Parker Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Paul Salveson.
Sterling Ruby, MORTAR (7452) (2020). Ceramic. 20.3 x 67.9 x 49.8 cm. Courtesy Sterling Ruby Studio and Gagosian. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer.

Renowned taste-maker Jeffrey Deitch presents a major group exhibition bringing together 37 artists working with a medium of the moment: ceramics.⁠⁠

Clay Pop, curated by Alia Williams, highlights the diversity of contemporary artists reenvisioning ceramic sculpture, from Genesis Belanger and Woody De Othello to Dominique Fung and Adam Silverman.⁠⁠

'Clay is being pushed beyond the confines of craft and design' notes the exhibition text, and the included artists 'are exploring issues of gender, race and identity, using clay in new ways to engage with social issues.'⁠⁠

The show runs in his New York location from 10 September to 30 October 2021.

Gladstone Gallery Announces Plans to Open in Seoul
Seoul, 09 September 2021

Barbara Gladstone has announced plans to open a gallery in Seoul, South Korea, confirming the city's rise in becoming a global art destination.⁠⁠

Announcing the news, Gladstone enthused, 'We are very happy to share the news that Gladstone will officially begin to expand its physical footprint to Asia. We have a long history of artists showing at some of Korea's most prestigious institutions, including a significant exhibition for Matthew Barney at the Leeum in 2005, and many more.'⁠⁠

KIAF, South Korea's most prestigious art fair, is due to take place between 13–17 October. International galleries such as Gladstone Gallery, Esther Schipper, and Peres Projects are all participating for the first time. ⁠⁠

In May, Frieze Art Fair announced plans for a Seoul edition in 2022, the fair's first Asian iteration. The exhibitor list is yet to be announced, and competition between galleries applying to take part is understood to be intense. ⁠⁠

Main image: Exhibition view: Anicka Yi: We Have Never Been Individual, Gladstone Gallery, Brussels, 2019. ⁠⁠Courtesy Gladstone Gallery.
David Zwirner Now Representing Steven Shearer
New York, 08 September 2021
Steven Shearer, Feathery Carver (2020). Oil with traces of charcoal on jute. Artist frame. 85.5 x 70 x 4 cm. © Steven Shearer. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich / New York⁠.

'I suppose the androgynous nature of my figures is related to my interest in fashion, how we stylise and manner ourselves for others. It also speaks to my approach to art-making, which has never been about physical reality; it's about fantasy and release.' — Steven Schearer, 2016⁠

David Zwirner has announced co-representation of the hyper in-demand artist Steven Shearer, in collaboration with his long-standing gallerist Eva Presenhuber. Shearer's first exhibition with David Zwirner is planned for 2023 in New York.⁠

Working From Life, the artist's hotly-anticipated current solo exhibition at Galerie Eva Presenhuber's Zurich location, continues until 16 October. The show highlights a new iconographical direction for the artist, portraits of artist-sculptors presenting their creations, haunted by the ghosts of the greek mythological figure, Pygmalion.⁠

Sculptural Highlights in Brussels
Brussels, 07 September 2021
Lynda Benglis, Silver Stud (2015–2016). Handmade paper over chicken wire, acrylic, acrylic medium, sparkles. 139.7 x 35.6 x 43.2 cm. Courtesy the artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels. Photo: HV-studio. ⁠⁠
Jonathan Meese, DER AQUA-SCHREI (ABER BITTE MIT SAHNE) (2020). Glazed ceramic, artist pedestal. 30.5 x 20.5 x 16 cm; 125 x 30 x 25 cm (pedestal). Courtesy Tim Van Laere Gallery, Antwerp.⁠⁠
Alma Allen, Not yet Titled (2021). Bronze. 300 x 104.2 x 73.4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo. Photo: Gerardo Landa Rojano.⁠⁠

Extraordinary sculptures by legendary Lynda Benglis, Alma Allen, and Jonathan Meese showing at Xavier Hufkens, Mendes Wood DM, and Tim Van Laere Gallery respectively take the hotspots in our Brussels Gallery Weekend selections.

See our full selections here.

Long-Awaited Joan Mitchell Retrospective Opens
San Francisco, 07 September 2021

Joan Mitchell was one of the very few women who made it into 'The Club'—the exclusive (male-dominated) gathering of artists who were to become the forerunners of the New York School of Abstract Expressionism.⁠⁠

Revered for her ability to unify physical experience with the emotions of the inner self through her fearlessly expressive works, she has now been honoured with a ground-breaking (and long-awaited) retrospective of over 80 works at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. ⁠⁠

Demand for her extraordinary paintings has skyrocketed. Most recently, her three-metre-tall 1962 painting 12 Hawks at 3 O'Clock, which stole the show at this year's Art Basel in Hong Kong, sold for $20M, as covered in Ocula News.

The exhibition will travel to Baltimore Museum of Art on 6 March 2022.

Main image: Joan Mitchell, Untitled (1992). Komal Shah and Gaurav Garg Collection. © Estate of Joan Mitchell.
Doron Langberg's Intoxicating Colours at Victoria Miro
London, 04 September 2021

New York-based painter Doron Langberg's first solo exhibition with Victoria Miro is on view until 6 November 2021 in London.

Langberg's masterful treatment of subjects and materials alongside his employment of intoxicating colour have forged his position within the new generation of figurative painters.⁠

Israeli-born Langberg received his MFA at Yale School of Art, and has recently been involved in a Carl Freedman Gallery exhibition curated by Russell Tovey, and will feature in a major group exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston next year. ⁠

Main image: Doron Langberg, Bather (2021). Courtesy Victoria Miro.
Megan Rooney Returns to London
London, 03 September 2021
Megan Rooney, Blue departure (2021). Acrylic and oil stick on canvas. 199,6 x 152,3 x 3,5 cm. Courtesy Thaddaeus Ropac.
Megan Rooney, Blue departure (2021) (detail). Acrylic and oil stick on canvas. 199,6 x 152,3 x 3,5 cm. Courtesy Thaddaeus Ropac.

Paintings by the brilliant Megan Rooney grace the walls of Thaddaeus Ropac for the artist's first solo show in London in five years.⁠⁠

Highly intuitive, her contemporary reinvigoration of mid-century abstraction—often spreading beyond the confines of her canvases—has seen the curatorial demand for the London-based artist skyrocket. ⁠⁠

In a recent Ocula Advisory Perspectives piece, Laurie Barron explored Rooney's intuitive methods, her new series of works on paper for the show, and ⁠⁠Hans Ulrich Obrist's praise for her story-telling abilities.⁠⁠

Top Ten September Gallery Shows from London to New York
01 September 2021
Sofia Mitsola, Aquamarina, Caryatids, Opalescent Skies (2021). Oil on canvas. 240 x 210 cm. Courtesy Pilar Corrias.
Kudzanai-Violet Hwami, Expiation (2021). Oil, acrylic, oil stick and silk screen on canvas, 127.5 x 119.5 cm. ©️ Kudzanai-Violet Hwami. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro
Doron Langberg, Bather (2021). Oil on linen. 243.8 x 203.2 cm. ©️ Doron Langberg. Courtesy the artist and Victoria Miro.
Steven Shearer, Wizard (2020). Courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber.
Alan Turner, Couch Couch (1988). Oil on canvas. © Alan Turner. Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London.
Kim Tschang-Yeul, Waterdrops (1986). India ink, oil, and acrylic on canvas. 195 x 161.3 cm. Courtesy Tina Kim Gallery.
Philip Guston, Back View II (1978). Oil on canvas. 185.4 x 205.7 cm. © The Estate of Philip Guston. Courtesy the Estate and Hauser & Wirth. Private collection
Mickalene Thomas, Jet Blue #25 (2021). Rhinestones, acrylic paint, chalk pastel, mixed media paper and archival pigment prints on museum board mounted on dibond. 213.995 x 154.94 cm. © Mickalene Thomas. Courtesy Lévy Gorvy.
Simone Leigh, Titi (1352-Y) (2021). Glazed stoneware. 64.8 x 31.1 x 36.2 cm. © Simone Leigh. Courtesy Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Thomas Barratt.
Amoako Boafo, MONSTERA LEAF SLEEVES (2021). Oil and paper transfer on canvas. 210 x 180 cm. Courtesy Roberts Projects.

With the arrival of September, we select our top ten exhibition openings in the month ahead, including Doron Langberg's debut show at Victoria Miro, the late Kim Tschung-Yeul's wonderful waterdrop paintings at Tina Kim Gallery, and Mickalene Thomas' international exhibition across Levy Gorvy's four spaces in New York, London, Paris, and Hong Kong. ⁠⁠

Sofia Mitsola at Pilar Corrias, London (2 September–2 October 2021)

Kudzanai-Violet Hwami at Victoria Miro, London (3 September–6 November 2021)

Doron Langberg at Victoria Miro, London (3 September–6 November 2021)⁠⁠

Steven Shearer at Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich (4 September–16 October 2021)⁠⁠

Alan Turner at Sadie Coles HQ, London (4 September–23 October 2021)⁠⁠

Kim Tschang-Yeul at Tina Kim Gallery, New York (9 September–16 October 2021)⁠⁠

Philip Guston at Hauser & Wirth, New York (9 September–16 October 2021)⁠⁠

Mickalene Thomas at Lévy Gorvy, New York (9 September–31 October 2021)⁠⁠

Simone Leigh at Hauser & Wirth, Zurich (17 September–4 December 2021)

Amoako Boafo at Roberts Projects, Los Angeles (18 September–6 November 2021)⁠⁠

Alice Neel Celebrated by Galleries and Institutions Worldwide
27 August 2021

This wonderful drawing by Alice Neel is included in Xavier Hufkens' online exhibition Alice Neel — On Paper, running until 25 September 2021.

This year, her captivating portraits were the subject of a major travelling exhibition, Alice Neel: People Come First, which opened at The Metropolitan Museum of Art back in March, and will be travelling on to Guggenheim Museum Bilbao on 17 September, before heading to Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco next March.

Accompanied by a solo show at David Zwirner opening on 9 September 2021 and a major retrospective at Centre Pompidou rescheduled for October next year, it seems there will be many an opportunity to catch a glimpse of her unparalleled work. ⁠⁠

Main image: Alice Neel, John Reclining (1967). Ink on paper. 27.3 x 35.2 cm. Courtesy Xavier Hufkens.
Thaddeus Mosley's Gravity-Defying Structures Celebrate the Legacy of African Sculpture and European Modernism
Maryland, 26 August 2021
Thaddeus Mosley, Opposing Parallels - Blues Up and Down for G. Ammons and S. Stitt (2015). Courtesy the Artist. Photo: Courtesy the artist and Karma, New York.

Engineered from felled wood sourced from sawmills in nearby Pittsburgh, Thaddeus Mosley's dense, yet delicate sculptures are gleaned from African sculpture and the works of European Modernists including Isamu Noguchi and Alberto Giacometti.

Accosting his improvisational technique to the spontaneity of Jazz, he once said 'I use different widths and depths of gouge to make different marks. Shadows are the means by which one can appreciate the rhythms of chisel marks'.

The Philadelphia-born artists' spectacular chiselled wooden sculptures are soon to receive a prestigious—and long-awaited—solo exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art in Maryland, covered by Ocula Advisory ahead of its opening on 17th October.

Nicolas Party Fervour Continues To Rise with Major European Institutional Shows
Lugano, 25 August 2021
Exhibition view: Nicolas Party, Rovine, MASI Lugano, Switzerland. (27 June 2021–9 January 2022). Photo credit: Annik Wetter.
Exhibition view: Nicolas Party, Rovine, MASI Lugano, Switzerland. (27 June 2021–9 January 2022). Photo credit: Annik Wetter.
Exhibition view: Nicolas Party, Rovine, MASI Lugano, Switzerland. (27 June 2021–9 January 2022). Photo credit: Annik Wetter.

Nicolas Party is an artist whose popularity continues to grow among collectors and curators alike. With a spattering of institutional shows this year—namely Le Consortium, MASI Lugano and a site specific commission for the iconic cylindrical exterior of the Hirschhorn Museum to open in September 2021, Nicolas Party's slick, eye-popping installations manage to draw equal acclaim with audiences in Asia, Europe and the US.

Pictured is his current show Rovine at MASI Lugano in Switzerland—his first major monographic exhibition to be displayed in a European museum.

Andra Ursuţa's Glistening Glass-Cast Sculptures Mark the Beginning of her David Zwirner Journey
Paris, 20 August 2021

Rising star Andra Ursuţa's work was spotted by David Zwirner at her 2019 solo presentation at the 58th Venice Biennale.

Fast-forward two years and the Romanian-born, New York-based artist will be opening a solo show at David Zwirner's Paris gallery on 4th September. ⁠

Ocula Advisory covered the shows standout works (including this exquisite work Predators 'R Us finished in glistening lead crystal), her incredibly scrupulous methods, and how her approach to functionality aligns her work alongside important feminist artists including Magdalena Abakanowicz and Sarah Lucas.

Main image: Andra Ursuţa, Impersonal Growth (2020). Photo: Dario Lasagni © Andra Ursuţa Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner
Tomokazu Matsuyama Joins Kavi Gupta's International Roster
19 August 2021
Tomokazu Matsuyama, Minimal Celestine (2021). Acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 54 x 54 x 2 in.

Kavi Gupta announced its representation of Brooklyn-based Japanese artist Tomokazu Matsuyama. Currently part of a group show at the Chicago-based gallery's Elizabeth St location, the artists' first solo exhibition with the gallery is planned for January 2022.

Since receiving his MFA in 2000 from New York's Pratt Institute, his delicately drawn imagery and eclectic colour palette—gleaned from Edo Japanese traditions and fashion magazines—has garnered international attention, notably in Japan, where his 24ft-tall sculpture sits at the centre of Tokyo's busy Shinjuki East Square.

Ocula Magazine covered Matsuyama's travelling exhibition Accountable Nature, on show at Shanghai's Long Museum earlier this year.

Christina Quarles' List of Firsts Spells the Start of Something Already Big
London, 18 August 2021
Christina Quarles, Casually Cruel (2018). Acrylic on canvas, 195.5 x 243.8 cm. Tate: Presented by Peter Dubens 2019. 
Christina Quarles, Casually Cruel (2018) (detail). Acrylic on canvas, 195.5 x 243.8 cm. Tate: Presented by Peter Dubens 2019. 
Christina Quarles, Yew Brought it Up (2018). Acrylic on canvas, 139.7 x 218.4 cm. Collection of Aishti Foundation, Beirut, Lebanon. 
Christina Quarles, Yew Brought it Up (2018) (detail). Acrylic on canvas, 139.7 x 218.4 cm. Collection of Aishti Foundation, Beirut, Lebanon. 
Christina Quarles, Sumday (We Gunna Rest On) Sunday (2019).  Acrylic on canvas, 182.9 x 243.8cm. Collection of Aishti Foundation, Beirut, Lebanon. 
Christina Quarles, Sumday (We Gunna Rest On) Sunday (2019) (detail).  Acrylic on canvas, 182.9 x 243.8cm. Collection of Aishti Foundation, Beirut, Lebanon. 

A lot of firsts for LA-based Christina Quarles this year. Having had her first solo exhibitions in major Asian and European museums—at X Museum in Beijing and at The Hepworth Wakefield in Yorkshire—Quarles work is currently the subject of a solo exhibition at South London Gallery, her first at a major London institution.

Speaking with Ocula Magazine earlier this year on the work in her solo exhibition concurrently running at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Quarles explained, 'It's always a back and forth between a memory of drawing the figure and then observing what I'm actually doing. This is echoed in communication, too: intent and then actuality. That's why moments like drips on the painting can determine the whole road I go down.'

Heading down to her show—entitled Christina Quarles: In Likeness—and walking amongst her large canvases brandished with her distinctive surreal bodies, of contorted limbs and free gestural brushstrokes, one understands the draw that these intriguing paintings are having on curators and collectors alike. ⁠⁠

With representation from the London-based Pilar Corrias, and more recently Hauser & Wirth, they'll be many an opportunity to see her work in the coming years.

Artist Yuichi Hirako's Brilliant Body of Work in his First Show with Gallery Baton
Seoul, 13 August 2021
Exhibition view: Yuichi Hirako, Mount Mariana, Gallery Baton, Seoul (13 August–16 September 2021). Courtesy Gallery Baton.
Exhibition view: Yuichi Hirako, Mount Mariana, Gallery Baton, Seoul (13 August–16 September 2021). Courtesy Gallery Baton.

We caught a glimpse of Yuichi Hirako's solo exhibition at Gallery Baton in anticipation of its opening tomorrow in Seoul. ⁠⁠Writing about the artist for Ocula advisory, Rory Mitchell noted that the artists 'surreal, figurative paintings rendered in bold, painterly brushstrokes are indicative of a global trend in contemporary painting', and to 'expect the queue for Hirako's work to lengthen over the next few months'.

'Mount Mariana' is Yuichi Hirako's first solo exhibition at Gallery Baton, having gained growing international recognition off the back of solo shows with Kotaro Nukaga in Tokyo and The Warehouse Gallery in Hong Kong earlier this year. Originally from Okayama in southern Japan, Hirako went on to receive his BFA from London's Wimbledon College of Arts in 2006. ⁠⁠

Hirako's unique style full of hybrid figurations brilliantly combines the classical, and somewhat surreal, fruit and vegetable portraits of the imaginative court painter, Giuseppe Arcimboldo, with fictional settings gleaned from the rural Japanese landscape where he grew up. ⁠⁠

Mystical, ominous, yet strangely alluring, Hirako has created a brilliant body of work for this show and we look forward to following his career closely.

Who Are the Top Young Artists at Auction in 2021?⁠⁠
London, 12 August 2021

The first half of 2021 has seen great results at auction for young emerging stars with five artists—born after 1980—bringing in over $5M each at auction. ⁠⁠

While the sales of the self-taught Japanese artist Ayako Rokkaku came overwhelmingly from Asia, Matthew Wong, Avery Singer, Salman Toor, and Amoako Baofo have seen a stronger global interest for their works.⁠⁠

Read the full Ocula News article here.

Main image: Ayako Rokkaku, Untitled (ARP21-09) (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 140 x 200 cm. Courtesy KÖNIG GALERIE.⁠⁠
Michael Armitage's Royal Academy Exhibition Confirms his Status as New Superstar of Figurative Painting
London, 11 August 2021
Michael Armitage, Pathos and the twilight of the idle (2019) (detail). Oil on Lubugo bark cloth. 330 × 170 cm. Photo: Rory Mitchell.
Michael Armitage, Mydas (2019) (detail). Oil on lubugo bark cloth. 220 x 170 cm. Photo: Rory Mitchell.
Michael Armitage, The Fourth Estate (2017) (detail). Oil on lubugo bark cloth. 330 x 200 cm. Photo: Rory Mitchell.
Michael Armitage, The Accomplice (2019) (detail). Oil on lubugo bark cloth. 220 × 300 cm. Photo: Rory Mitchell.
Michael Armitage, The Promise of Change (2019) (detail). Oil on lubugo bark cloth. 220.3 × 241.3 cm. Photo: Rory Mitchell.

One of our standout shows of 2021 has to be Michael Armitage's solo exhibition Paradise Edict (22 May–19 September 2021) at the Royal Academy of Arts.

The artist's career exploded after he joined White Cube in 2015, with hugely successful shows at the gallery's London and Hong Kong spaces before recent institutional exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Haus der Kunst in Munich propelled him into an elite group of contemporary painters equally revered by curators and collectors.

The young Kenyan-born artist studied in London at The Slade School of Fine Art and the Royal Academy—where he still spends much of his time—perhaps explaining his rigorous approach to painting, harvested from a deep appreciation of past masters. Goya, Gauguin and a raft of other titans of Western painting seep into his work, together with more contemporary influences, such as Francis Bacon and Peter Doig.

The raw desperation of his figures, combined with references to contemporary Kenyan society, immediately frees his paintings from the shackles of his heroes though; instead they ingrain themselves into our consciousness.

Alluring and shocking, magical and universal, Armitage's paintings encompass all that figurative painting has to offer, and on a grand scale worthy of his predecessors.

Could this be the next superstar painter following in the footsteps of Peter Doig?

Jules de Balincourt and Pace Gallery in Cahoots
London, 10 August 2021
Jules de Balincourt, New Arrivals (2021). Oil on panel, 200 cm × 165.1 cm × 6.4cm. © Jules de Balincourt. Courtesy Pace Gallery⁠⁠.
Jules de Balincour. Courtesy Pace Gallery. Photo: Melissa Goodwin. 

Based between Brooklyn and Costa Rica, Jules de Balincourt is the latest artist to join Pace Gallery's roster, in collaboration with Victoria Miro Gallery and Thaddaeus Ropac.

On this move, Pace's President and CEO Marc Glimcher notes this as an exciting opportunity to share de Balincourt's vision with their audiences in the U.S. and Asia. ⁠⁠

Exploring humanity's troubled relationships with the natural and urban environment, de Balincourt's rich utopian landscapes were the subject of a solo show at Ropac in 2020, prior to his first solo exhibition in Spain at the Centro de Arte Contemporáneo earlier this year.

His first exhibition with the gallery will show in Hong Kong in March 2022. ⁠⁠

Phillips Reports Sales of Over Half a Billion, Helped by Gerhard Richter
London, 05 August 2021

It's been a great year for Phillips as they report sales of over half a billion US dollars in the first half of 2021, an increase of 25 percent on 2019, undoubtedly helped by the sale of Gerhard Richter's Abstraktes Bild (940-7) going for USD $12,258,390 (HKD $95,100,000) at their Contemporary Hong Kong sale in June. ⁠

With 17 artists setting new world records, it was interesting to see how many of those set were by emerging stars signalling the extraordinary rise in their market demand. ⁠

With a high estimate of $96,200, Beijing-born Huang Yuxing's work Bubbles sold at close to $750,000, while Emily Mae Smith's Broom Life went for just over $1.5M, over 20 time its high estimate, and finally the late Matthew Wong's Figure in a Night Landscape surpassing its estimate of $1,030,000 going for $4.7M.⁠

Summer Solos by Andrew Cranston and Mimi Lauter Steal the Show
New York, 21 July 2021
Andrew Cranston, Deja vu (2021). Rabbit skin glue and pigment on canvas, 230 x 200 cm. Courtesy Karma Gallery, New York. 
Mimi Lauter, Consequential Landscape (2020). Oil, pastel, soft pastel on paper, 158.4 x 193.4 cm⁠⁠. Courtesy Mendes Wood DM, Brussels.

We love these two works by Glasgow-based Andrew Cranston and LA-based Mimi Lauter who both have solo shows at New York's Karma gallery and Brussel's Mendes Wood DM's space respectively this summer. ⁠⁠

The first, entitled Deja vu (2021), is Cranston''s brilliant large-scale landscape. First dyed with pigment, then bleached, his canvases are filled with beautiful figurative vignettes of dappled, dream-like scenes. ⁠⁠

The second is Lauter''s surreal oil and soft pastel on paper work. Like Cranston, her works are full of iridescent colour, inspired by the natural world around her, which she treats as an almost theatrical space to present her vivid, liminal universe. ⁠⁠

Recent Museum Acquisitions: Catherine Opie and Billie Zangewa
18 July 2021
Catherine Opie, Pig Pen (1993). Crystal Bridges Museum of American ArtBentonville, Arkansas.
Billie Zangewa, Self-Care Sunday (2020). ICA BostonBoston, Massachusetts.
Billie Zangewa, Everyday Miracle (2020). Minneapolis Institute of ArtMinneapolis, Minnesota.

Great works by Catherine Opie and Billie Zangewa have been acquired by major international museum collections⁠.⁠⁠

Catherine Opie's Pig Pen (1993) will be joining the collection of the fast-growing Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, while Billie Zangewa—who joined the gallery last year—will see her embroidered portrait Everyday Miracle (2020) entering the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art and Self Care Sunday (2020) in the prestigious ICA Boston.

Self Care Sunday (2020) is currently on view at The FLAG Art Foundation until 13 August 2021.

The news was announced by Lehmann Maupin on 13 July 2021.

Karma Inaugurates New Location With Lee Lozano Works on Paper
New York, 16 July 2021
Exhibition view: Lee Lozano: Drawings 1959-64, Karma, 22 East 2nd Street, New York (12 July–13 August 2021). Courtesy Karma.
Exhibition view: Lee Lozano: Drawings 1959-64, Karma, 22 East 2nd Street, New York (12 July–13 August 2021). Courtesy Karma.
Lee Lozano, No title (1961). Graphite and crayon on paper. 44.5 × 57 cm; 54.6 × 67.6 cm (framed). Courtesy Karma.
Lee Lozano, No title (1962). Crayon on paper. 34.9 × 42.5 cm; 40.6 × 48.3 cm (framed). Courtesy Karma.
Lee Lozano, No title (1963). Crayon on paper. 27.4 × 35 cm; 45.2 × 53.2 cm (framed). Courtesy Karma.

Karma inaugurates its 22 East 2nd Street location with a beautifully curated exhibition of 200 works on paper by the groundbreaking artist Lee Lozano. ⁠⁠

Spanning from her more traditional studies while still a student at the Art Institute of Chicago, to the transgressive and provocative iconography of her New York days in the 1960s, the drawings on show exhibit Lozano's scrutiny of body politics and the structures of institutional power oozing in her unique mercurial and humorous manner. ⁠⁠

Claas Reiss Features Tenki Hiramatsu at Newly Opened Gallery
London, 15 July 2021
Tenki Hiramatsu, No problem! (2021). Oil and acrylic on wooden panel. 60 x 50 x 3 cm. Courtesy Claas Reiss.

Claas Reiss is a recent addition to the London gallery scene and his third exhibition is Good Con Man by young Japanese painter Tenki Hiramatsu, who lives and works in Karlsruhe, Germany.

Hiramatsu works intuitively in an abstract manner, although figures reveal themselves sporadically during the process.

These cartoon-like characters are weird, humorous, and surprisingly emotive, but it's the combination of colours and transparent layers that proves to be most absorbing.

Thomas J Price Joins Hauser & Wirth
London, 10 July 2021

On 8 July 2021, Hauser & Wirth announced British sculptor Thomas J Price will be joining their roster. His first exhibition with the gallery will show in Somerset in October. ⁠

Price spoke with Ocula Magazine back in 2019 about the development of his sculptural practice, the role of the Black male body, and his past performance, Licked, where he licked an entire gallery wall over three days.

'Men have often been depicted as strong authoritative, and resolved, historically, and I always wanted to reveal the inner workings of their emotional worlds'.—Thomas J Price. ⁠

Pictured is his brilliant 2016 'Numen' series, which showed at Frieze London in 2017. ⁠

Main image: Thomas J Price, Numen (Shifting Votive Three) (2016). Courtesy the artist and Hales Gallery.
Liu Wei at White Cube Bermondsey
London, 09 July 2021
Liu Wei, ‘The East’ (2021). Photo: Simon Fisher.
Liu Wei, Vanguard (2021). Photo: Simon Fisher.
Liu Wei, Nudity No. (2021). Photo: Simon Fisher.

Liu Wei's exhibition opened on 9 July 2021 at White Cube and it's absolutely fantastic. For those in London, we highly recommend heading down to Bermondsey to see it.

Pictured is a great painting from his 'The East' series, alongside this futuristic aluminium sculpture entitled Vanguard and one of his brilliant abstract 'Nudity' oil paintings.⁠⁠

Mark Barker's Biomorphic Stoneware
Cologne, 07 July 2021
Mark Barker, Untitled (2021). Stoneware, gesso, beeswax. 62 x 29 x 39 cm. Courtesy Zarinbal Khoshbakht.
Mark Barker, Untitled (2021). Stoneware. 34 x 28 x 15.5 cm. Courtesy Zarinbal Khoshbakht.
Mark Barker, Untitled (2021). Stoneware, slip. 50.5 x 28 x 30 cm. Courtesy Zarinbal Khoshbakht.

Mark Barker is a British artist now based in Berlin. His current exhibition with Zarinbal Khoshbakht in Cologne, running until 7 August 2021, is exquisite.⁠⁠

Biomorphic forms conflate with more explicitly figurative elements, revealing expressive gestures that ache with the burden of emotion.⁠⁠

Each surface of stoneware or clay sculpture bristles with energy through its imperfections and variations of tone, whether decaying or alive, the skin is tactile and these figures haunt us like intimate memories. ⁠⁠

Frank Gehry's LUMA Arles Tower Opens to the Public
Arles, 01 July 2021
Photo: © Adrian Deweerdt⁠.

LUMA Arles, the much-anticipated art campus in Arles in the south of France, has opened to the public. Its Van Gogh-inspired tower—housing galleries, project spaces, and research rooms—is nothing short of a spectacle. ⁠

The project, or 'experimental cultural centre', has been driven by Swiss art collector Maja Hoffman and is teamed by a core group of curators, directors, and artists including Hans Ulrich Obrist and Tom Eccles. ⁠

Although Frank Gehry's silver tower is ultimately the pièce de résistance, the surrounding campus is home to former railway factories turned exhibition and performance spaces and expansive gardens that feature outdoor sculptures, including a glow-in-the-dark skatepark by Koo Jeong A and an installation by Carsten Höller. ⁠

Read more about this exciting new space in Ocula News.

Advisory Picks: Christie's 20th / 21st Century: London to Paris
London, 01 July 2021
Keith Haring, Untitled (1984). Acrylic on canvas, in four parts each: 152.4 x 152.4 cm. Overall: 304.8 x 304.8 cm. Courtesy Christie's.

This sensational Keith Haring painting from 1984 sold for GBP 4,301,250 at Christie's 20th / 21st Century: London to Paris Sale on 30 June.

Dated from the year the first Apple Macintosh was produced, Haring's monumental four-part canvas envisages the tech-driven chaos that was to overwhelm our world over the course of the next few decades.

Advisory Picks: Christie's 20th / 21st Century: London to Paris
London, 30 June 2021

This mesmerising Alexander Calder sculpture went up for sale at Christie's 20th / 21st Century: London to Paris Sale on 30 June.

An example of one of his earlier works, this 1944 hanging sculpture—made of glass, Plexiglass, and pottery fragments, and suspended from wire beams and string—epitomises the brilliant delicacy and harmony of Calder's craftsmanship. ⁠

The sculpture sold for GBP 4,342,500.

Main image: Alexander Calder, Untitled (c.1944). Hanging mobile – pottery shards, glass shards, Plexiglas, wire and string. 86.4 x 78.7 x 66 cm. Courtesy Christie's.
Advisory Picks: Christie's 20th / 21st Century: London to Paris
London, 30 June 2021
Lucian Freud, A Plate of Prawns (1958). Oil on canvas. 22.2 x 26.9 cm. Courtesy Christie's.

Painted with the same brisk physicality and realism as his portraits, A Plate of Prawns (1958) is one of two Lucian Freud works that went under the hammer at Christie's 20th / 21st Century: London to Paris Sale on 30 June. The painting was sold for GBP 922,500.

Advisory Picks: Sotheby's Modern & Contemporary Art Evening Sale
London, 29 June 2021
Wassily Kandinsky, Tensions calmées (1937). Oil on canvas. 89.3 by 116.6 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's.
Cy Twombly, Untitled (1964). Oil, wax crayon, and graphite on canvas. 100 x 109.8 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's.

Keep an eye out for these two abstract paintings up for auction at Sotheby's Modern & Contemporary Art Evening Sale in London on 29 June 2021.

While the sale of Cy Twombly's work is always an exciting watch, Kandinsky's groundbreaking Tensions calmées is a highly anticipated lot, up for auction for the first time in 57 years. ⁠⁠

Bought by Solomon R. Guggenheim (a friend of Kandinsky's) in 1945, it was then sold via Sotheby's in ⁠1964 to its current owner where it has remained ever since. Tomorrow it's up for auction with a high estimate of £25M!⁠⁠

Wassily Kandinsky, Tensions calmées (1937). Estimate 18,000,000 - 25,000,000 GBP⁠⁠

Cy Twombly, Untitled (1964). Estimate 5,000,000 - 7,000,000 GBP⁠⁠

Advisory Picks: Sotheby's British Art Evening Sale
London, 29 June 2021
Lucian Freud, David Hockney (2002). Oil on canvas. 40.6 x 31.1 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's.
Chris Ofili, Still Smoking (1997). Acrylic, oil, polyester resin, elephant dung, paper collage, glitter, and map pins on linen, with two elephant dung supports. 191.7 x 121.9 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's.
Peter Lanyon, Rising Air (1961). Oil on canvas. 156 x 125 cm (framed). Courtesy Sotheby's.

Lucian Freud, Chris Ofili, and Peter Lanyon are among the artists whose works are up for auction at Sotheby's British Art Evening Sale in London on 29 June 2021.

Freud's portrait of fellow artist and friend, David Hockney, is particularly special. Painted over the summer of 2002, Hockney would walk over to Freud's flat near Holland Park at 8:30 am each morning for his sitting, passing the time by drinking tea, smoking, and chatting about the techniques of the old masters and beyond. ⁠⁠

This portrait represents a meeting of minds, and an expression of the shared admiration of two eminent British artists observing one another.

Lucian Freud, David Hockney (2002). Estimate 8,000,000 - 12,000,000 GBP⁠⁠

Chris Ofili, Still Smoking (1997). Estimate 600,000 - 800,000 GBP⁠⁠

Peter Lanyon, Rising Air (1961). Estimate 400,000 - 600,000 GBP⁠⁠

Huang Yuxing Grabs Global Attention
Brussels, 26 June 2021
Huang Yuxing, Pine by the pink sea (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 90 x 70 cm. Courtesy Almine Rech.⁠

Huang Yuxing's name has popped up more and more frequently over the past year, as his eccentric landscapes have caught the eye of collectors globally, and reached record prices at auction. ⁠

Enlightening quadrupled its high estimate at Christie's Hong Kong in July 2020, fetching $1.1M, while A Flourishing City Near the Yellow River Source (2019) and Riverside Grove under the Starry Night (2016) sailed past their high estimates, selling for $1.19M and $209K respectively at Christie's Hong Kong sale in May this year. ⁠

Almine Rech is currently host to Yuxing's ultra-contemporary works at their Brussels space, running until 31 July. ⁠

Matthew Lutz-Kinoy Takes Over Italian Country Estate
Biella, 26 June 2021
Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Grand Entrance for Bernardo Buontalenti (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 420 x 420 cm.⁠⁠ Courtesy Mendes Wood DM.
Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Garden chariot in blue (2021). Acrylic and charcoal on canvas. 260 x 170 cm⁠⁠. Courtesy Mendes Wood DM.
Matthew Lutz-Kinoy, Fade into Blake (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 650 x 450 cm⁠⁠. Courtesy Mendes Wood DM.

We would love to be roaming around Matthew Lutz-Kinoy's exhibition Grand Entrance in sunny Italy. ⁠⁠

Occupying the ground floor of Villa Era near the city of Biella, Northern Italy, the exhibition is Mendes Wood DM's second show at the Italian country estate.⁠⁠

Taking inspiration from the lavish performative festivities of Medici rulers, who temporarily transformed Florence into theatrical stages, Lutz-Kinoy places his works of Renaissance and Baroque decorative motifs against the backdrop of Villa Era's beautiful architecture to create a truly magical show. ⁠⁠

Joel Mesler Debuts in Asia at Lévy Gorvy
Hong Kong, 23 June 2021
Joel Mesler, Untitled (Surrender) (2021). Pigment on linen.⁠⁠ Courtesy Lévy Gorvy.
Joel Mesler, Untitled (Half Full) (2021). Pigment on linen.⁠⁠ Courtesy Lévy Gorvy.
Joel Mesler, Untitled (Play the Hits) (2021). Pigment on linen.⁠⁠ Courtesy Lévy Gorvy.

One can't help but feel uplifted standing in front of these wildly creative and cool Joel Mesler paintings. Showing in Asia for the first time, these new works by the art dealer turned artist are showing at Lévy Gorvy's Hong Kong space until 14 August. ⁠⁠

If you're in Hong Kong, Joel Mesler's show is definitely not one to miss!

Avis Newman Brings Drawing to Canvas
London, 23 June 2021
Avis Newman, The Weight of Souls I (2017–2018). Acrylic paint and chalk on cotton duck canvas and canvas board. Courtesy Maureen Paley, London / Hove
Avis Newman, The Weight of Souls I (2017–2018). Acrylic paint and chalk on cotton duck canvas and canvas board. Courtesy Maureen Paley, London / Hove
Avis Newman, The Weight of Souls I (2017–2018). Acrylic paint and chalk on cotton duck canvas and canvas board. Courtesy Maureen Paley, London / Hove
Avis Newman, The Weight of Souls I (2017–2018). Acrylic paint and chalk on cotton duck canvas and canvas board. Courtesy Maureen Paley, London / Hove

When standing in front of one of Avis Newman's works, it is important to bear in mind the meaning of drawing to the artist, as an act of gesturing; an implosion of thought and an articulation of a moment in time. ⁠⁠

'I understand drawing to evidence the materialisation of an act of consciousness – where the gestured act embodies the act of thought' — Avis Newman. ⁠⁠

This large-scale canvas work is currently showing at Maureen Paley's project space, Studio M, in their East London gallery. ⁠⁠

Brazilian Galleries Host
Collaborative Exhibition in Portugal

Comporta, 22 June 2021
Kim Lim, Narcissus (1959). Bronze, 61.6 x 52 x 52 cm. ⁠Courtesy Kim Lim Estate.
Marina Rheingantz, Marujo (2020). Oil on canvas, 170 x 210 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy the artist.
Ernesto Neto, Umbigo Ventre, Fruto Arte (2021). Cotton, voile crochet, expanded clay and wooden knobs. 73 x 95 x 46 cm. ⁠Courtesy the artist.
Edu de Barros, Tomado IV (2021). Acrylic, oil pastel, spray paint, graphite, charcoal and varnish on raw cotton. 152 x 162 cm.⁠ Courtesy the artist.

Occupying a former cinema within the historic Casa da Cultura Comporta in Comporta, Portugal, three Brazilian galleries—Fortes D'Aloia & Gabriel, Galeria Luisa Strina, and Sé—have come together to host a collaborative exhibition titled O Canto do Bode, which translates as 'The Song of the Goat'. ⁠⁠

Opening in two acts, on 24 June followed by 29 July, the exhibition presents the work of 36 artists, including Leonor Antunes, Juan Araujo, Ernesto Neto, Lucia Laguna, and Kim Lim in a scenography designed by artist João Maria Gusmão.

Advisory Selections from Art Basel OVR: Portals
16 June 2021
Ha Chong-hyun, Conjunction 20-34 (2020). Oil on hemp. 116.84 x 91.123 x 5.72 cm. © Ha Chong-hyun. Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo.
Matt Connors, Adapted Bug Chaser (2021). Oil, acrylic and pencil on canvas. 101.6 x 91.4 cm. Courtesy Herald St.
Hamish Fulton, Mountain Skyline. Wyoming 2017 (2017). Painting on paper. Framed: 34.3 x 37.3 x 3 cm. © Hamish Fulton. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Thomas Schute, Berlin.

We've selected our favourite works showing at Art Basel's first curator-led OVR, which is now open.

A 2020 'Conjuction' painting by the celebrated Ha Chong-Hyun, Matt Connors' alluring paint-soaked canvas, and an exquisite painting on paper by self-declared 'walking artist' Hamish Fulton are among our top works showing at Art Basel OVR: Portals.

Find the full selection here.

Eileen Agar at
Whitechapel Gallery

London, 12 June 2021

'I have spent my whole life in revolt against convention, trying to bring colour and light and a sense of the mysterious to daily existence. One must have a hunger for new colour, new shapes, and new possibilities of discovery.'—Eileen Agar ⁠

A retrospective of British artist Eileen Agar is now on view at Whitechapel Gallery until 29 August. ⁠

Main image: Eileen Agar, Erotic Landscape (1942). Collage on paper. 25.5 x 30.5 cm. Private collection. © Estate of Eileen Agar/Bridgeman Images. Courtesy Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. © Doug Atfield⁠.
Advisory Art Fair Selection:
JINGART Beijing

Beijing, 10 June 2021
Giorgio Morandi, Fiori (Flowers) (1947). Oil on canvas. 29.3 x 21.6 x 1.6 cm. Courtesy David Zwirner.
Ivy Haldeman, Double Hands Finger Extend (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 61 x 41.9 cm. © Ivy Haldeman. Courtesy the artist and Capsule Shanghai.
Lee Bul, Perdu LXVI (2020). Mother of pearl, acrylic paint on wooden base panel, steel frame. 80 x 60 x 6 cm / 83 x 63 x 6.5 cm (framed). Courtesy Lehmann Maupin.

Paintings by Giorgio Morandi, Ivy Haldeman, and Lee Bul are among our top picks at this year's art fair, JINGART Beijing. ⁠⁠

Running from 10–13 June, this is the fair's third iteration after it was founded by the dynamic trio behind ART021 Shanghai Contemporary Art Fair: Kylie Ying (Qing Lan), Bao Yifeng, and David Chau.

Visit the link in our to read our full selection of top works exhibited at this year's fair. ⁠⁠

Sculpture Highlights at
London Gallery Weekend

London, 09 June 2021
Thaddeus Mosley, Repetitive Reference (2015). Walnut. Courtesy the artist and Karma, New York⁠⁠. Photo: Lewis Roland.
Bruce Nauman, Hand Pair (1996). Silicon bronze. Hand pair: 11.4 x 39.1 x 14 cm; fingertip: 1.6 x 5.1 x 1.9 cm. Unique trial proof. Courtesy Bruce Nauman / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. ⁠⁠

We were amazed by these two sculptures showing last weekend at London Gallery Weekend, both seemingly held in suspension through incredible strategies of conjunction.

Bruce Nauman's silicon bronze hand sculpture is included in META VISCERAL, a group show at Lévy Gorvy, while Thaddeus Mosley's beautifully chiselled wooden sculpture is showing at Maximillian William alongside the celebrated work of Magdalene Odundo and Simone Leigh.

Phillips Sale Soars with
Yoshitomo Nara Painting

Hong Kong, 08 June 2021
Yoshitomo Nara, Missing in Action (2000). Acrylic on canvas. 165 x 150cm. Courtesy Philips and Poly Auction.

The undisputed star of the show for Phillips Hong Kong Evening Sale on 8 June 2021 was this Yoshitomo Nara painting titled Missing in Action.

The painting sold for just over $3 million in 2015 with Phillips, but Nara's prices have exploded in the last few years, so it came as no surprise when the painting fetched $16 million, the second highest price Nara has ever fetched at auction.

Sam Gaskin reported on the sale in Ocula News.

Six London Gallery Weekend Highlights
London, 03 June 2021
Stefanie Heinze, Studio Scenery (Clash of Muses) (2021). Oil and acrylic on linen, two parts. 205 x 290 cm. Courtesy Pippy Houldsworth Gallery.
Yayoi Kusama, On Hearing the Sunset Afterglow's Message of Love, My Heart Shed Tears (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 130.3 x 130.3 cm. © YAYOI KUSAMA. Courtesy Ota Fine Arts and Victoria Miro.
Frank Bowling, Swimmers (2020). Acrylic, acrylic gel and found objects on collaged canvas. 229.3 x 326.4 x 8 cm. © Frank Bowling. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Thomas Barratt.
Alicia Reyes McNamara, Misunderstood Spirit (2021). Oil on canvas. 30 x 40 cm. Courtesy Niru Ratnam.
Clementine Keith-Roach, Double Ocean (2021). Terracotta vessel, jesmonite, resin clay, modelling paste, acrylic paint and resin. 55 x 62 x 60 cm. Courtesy Ben Hunter.
Joseph Yaeger, The Euphemism (2021). Watercolour on gessoed linen 200.5 x 140.5 x 4 cm. Courtesy Project Native Informant.

Ocula Advisory select a collection of highlights showing in London for the inaugural London Gallery Weekend, from Yayoi Kusama's widely recognised dot paintings at Victoria Miro, to emerging artist Alicia Reyes McNamara's spellbinding Central London show at Niru Ratnam.

  1. Stefanie Heinze at Pippy Houldsworth Gallery
  2. Yayoi Kusama at Victoria Miro Gallery
  3. Frank Bowling at Hauser & Wirth
  4. Alicia Reyes McNamara Niru Ratnam
  5. Clementine Keith-Roach at Ben Hunter
  6. Joseph Yaeger at Project Native Informant
Joseph Yaeger and Alicia Reys McNamara
in London

London, 02 June 2021
Joseph Yaeger, Vertigo (2021). Watercolour on gessoed linen. 51 x 41 x 2 cm. Courtesy Project Native Informant.
Joseph Yaeger, The Euphemism (2021). Watercolour on gessoed linen 200.5 x 140.5 x 4 cm. Courtesy Project Native Informant.
Alicia Reyes McNamara, Guilty Moons (2021). Oil on canvas. 40 x 50 cm.
Alicia Reyes McNamara, Misunderstood Spirit (2021). Oil on canvas. 30 x 40 cm. Courtesy Niru Ratnam.

Two exciting young painters, Joseph Yaeger and Alicia Reyes McNamara, currently have solo exhibitions in London at Project Native Informant and Niru Ratnam respectively.

Both artists studied in the U.K., but take very different approaches to figurative painting. Yaeger uses watercolour on gessoed canvas to create images gleaned from fleeting memories, often incorporating reflections, doubling, or unconventional close-ups.

McNamara's work is centred around Mexican and Irish mythology, specifically water myths and often the female figures within these.

Francis Alÿs at
David Zwirner

Paris, 28 May 2021

The unique sense of depth and perspective achieved through the brilliant use of colour by Belgium-born artist Francis Alÿs is what we particularly love about this painting. ⁠

Representing Belgium at the 2022 Venice Biennale, Mexico-based artist Francis Alÿs opened his first show in David Zwirner's Paris gallery on 27 May, presenting an intriguing and moving collection of observational works.

Based on his study of border regions experiencing socio-political conflict, his paintings take viewers to Jerusalem, the Turkish-Armenian border, and the Panama Canal Zone, to name but a few. ⁠

Main image: Francis Alÿs, Untitled (Study for ‘Don’t Cross the Bridge Before You Get to the River’) (2007-2008). © Francis Alÿs. Courtesy the artist and David Zwirner⁠.
Michael Armitage at the
Royal Academy of Arts

London, 26 May 2021
Michael Armitage, The Chicken Thief (2019). Oil on lubugo bark cloth. 200 x 150 cm. Courtesy the artist and White Cube. © Michael Armitage. © White Cube (Theo Christelis).⁠ 

There's a lot to celebrate in London this month with the re-opening of the Royal Academy of Arts and a stream of other top art institutions post-lockdown. ⁠

The Royal Academy of Arts opens with Michael Armitage's ground-breaking exhibition, Paradise Edict, showcasing an extraordinary group of 15 Goya-esque works, which showed at Munich's Haus der Kunst last year.

Rendered on Ugandan lubugo cloth, The Chicken Thief draws on all corners of Armitage's life, from his upbringing in Nairobi and his education at London's Slade School of Art, to his return to the landscapes, politics, and visual narratives of Kenya, where he keeps a studio.⁠

Alberto Biasi at M77
Milan, 25 May 2021
Alberto Biasi, Agli estremi (2010). Carving and acrylic on canvas. 147 x 83 x 5 cm. Exhibition view: The Visibility of the Invisible, M77, Milan (17 May–19 September 2021). Courtesy Alberto Biasi Archive and M77. Photo: Michael Haggerty.

We really enjoyed reading Ocula Magazine Associate Editor Tessa Moldan's Insight into Alberto Biasi's practice.

The artist's kinetic, illusory works placed him at the forefront of the post-war Italian art scene. ⁠The Visibility of the Invisible at M77 in Milan traces the artist's 60-year career, from his interest in art and science as a young boy in the 1940s growing up in Padua to spearheading Gruppo N in the 1960s.

Samson Young
at Capitain Petzel

Berlin, 22 May 2021
Samson Young, DAO35 (2021). 3D printed PLA, custom-software and electronics. 84 x 14 x 14 cm. Courtesy Capitain Petzel. ⁠

Traversing physical and digital realms, Samson Young's latest sculpture DAO35 is part of a larger exploration into Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching—a 6th century BC classical Taoist text.

Chapters from the text are run through the sculpture's algorithmic framework, in turn producing an output of text, or 'translation', which is both 3D-printed as well as sent in the form of call to Galerie Gisela Capitain in Cologne. Pretty cool! ⁠

The Hong Kong-based artist is the winner of both the prestigious 2015 BMW Art Journey Prize and the inaugural Sigg Prize in 2020, established in 2018 by Hong Kong's M+ museum.⁠

Ocula Magazine spoke to the artist in 2017, in the wake of the artist's solo project at the 57th Venice Biennale in Hong Kong. The artist's exhibition at Capitain Petzel in Berlin runs until 19 June.

Tomoo Gokita
at Blum & Poe

Los Angeles, 19 May 2021

Supernatural figures conjured from Tomoo Gokita's imagination form the subject of the Tokyo-based artist's solo exhibition Fresh at Blum & Poe's Los Angeles space, running until 26 June.⁠

Greyscale works have formed the basis of Gokita's oeuvre over the last decade, however this new series of paintings sees a renewed exploration into sultry pastel colours portraying dreamlike figures with a similar contortion employed by that of the Surrealists.⁠

Main image: Tomoo Gokita, Our Delight (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 162 x 162 cm. © Tomoo Gokita. Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/New York/Tokyo⁠.
Advisory Picks: Christie's
20th Century Evening Sale

New York, 12 May 2021
Pablo Picasso, Femme assise près d’une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse) (1932). Oil on canvas. 144.78  x 111.76 cm. © Christie’s Images Limited 2021⁠⁠.
Piet Mondrian, Composition: No II, With Yellow, Red and Blue (1927). Oil on canvas. 48.26 x 35.56 cm. ⁠© Christie’s Images Limited 2021⁠⁠.
Lee Krasner, Untitled (1962). Oil on canvas. 162.56 x 147.32 cm. © Christie’s Images Limited 2021⁠⁠.
Ellsworth Kelly, Medium Blue Panel (1986). Oil on shaped canvas. 210.2 x 262.9 cm.⁠⁠ © Christie’s Images Limited 2021⁠⁠.

Picasso, Mondrian, Krasner, and Kelly's works are some our favourites that went up for auction at Christie's 20th Century Evening Sale on 13 May. ⁠⁠

Pablo Picasso, Femme assise près d'une fenêtre (Marie-Thérèse) (1932). Oil on canvas. 144.78 x 111.76 cm.

Piet Mondrian, Composition: No II, With Yellow, Red and Blue (1927). Oil on canvas. 48.26 x 35.56 cm. ⁠⁠

Lee Krasner, Untitled (1962). Oil on canvas. 162.56 x 147.32 cm. Estimate USD 5,000,000-7,000,000. ⁠⁠

Ellsworth Kelly, Medium Blue Panel (1986). Oil on shaped canvas. 210.2 x 262.9 cm.⁠⁠ Estimate USD 3,800,000 - 5,000,000.

NFT: Banksy
at Sotheby’s

11 May 2021

After the historic inaugural NFT sales of works by the digital artists Beeple and Pak at Christie's and Sotheby's respectively, we are beginning to see auction houses adapting to the increased fervour surrounding cryptocurrency as a form of payment and digital arts appeal as the NFT market has emerged.⁠

While cryptocurrency was accepted by Sotheby's for their NFT sale, Banksy's _Love is in the Air _is the first physical work to be offered at an auction house in exchange for cryptocurrency; specifically bitcoin and ethereum.⁠

Read Sam Gaskin's recent coverage on the sale here.

Main image: Banksy, Love is in the Air (2005). Oil and spray paint on canvas. 90 x 90 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's⁠.
Huma Bhabha
at Salon 94

New York, 11 May 2021
Huma Bhabha, Receiver (2019). Bronze. 250.8 x 45.7 x 63.5 cm.⁠ © Huma Bhabha⁠⁠. Courtesy the artist and Salon 94, New York.
Huma Bhabha, Receiver (2019) (detail). Bronze. 250.8 x 45.7 x 63.5 cm.⁠ © Huma Bhabha⁠⁠. Courtesy the artist and Salon 94, New York.
Huma Bhabha, Receiver (2019) (detail). Bronze. 250.8 x 45.7 x 63.5 cm.⁠ © Huma Bhabha⁠⁠. Courtesy the artist and Salon 94, New York.

At eight feet tall, Receiver by Huma Bhabha is an imposing and fabulously evocative sculpture, perfectly embodying the artist's reinterpretation of relics and monuments of the ancient world. ⁠⁠

Her sublime sculptures look to reimagine the power historically attributed to monuments, placing works such as Receiver in the realm of what we understand as counter-monuments. ⁠⁠

Facing Giants, Huma Bhabha's solo show at Salon 94's 89th Street space in New York runs until 26 June. ⁠⁠

Advisory Picks: Christie's 21st Century Evening Sale
New York, 11 May 2021
Alex Da Corte, Night Vision (2018). Neon, house paint, vinyl siding, laminate, plywood, epoxy clay, and hardware. 182.9 x 182.9 x 15.2 cm. © Christie’s Images Limited 2021⁠⁠.
Mickalene Thomas, Racquel Reclining Wearing Purple Jumpsuit (2016). Oil, acrylic, silkscreen, rhinestones, faux pearls, glitter, graphite and flock on wood panel, in two parts. 243.8 x 365.8 cm. © Christie’s Images Limited 2021⁠⁠.
Sigmar Polke, Ohne Titel (Bunnies) (2000). Acrylic on paper. 200 x 150 cm. © Christie’s Images Limited 2021⁠⁠.

Ocula Advisory select their favourites from Christie's 21st Century Evening Sale in New York on 11 May.⁠⁠

Alex Da Corte, Night Vision (2018). Neon, house paint, vinyl siding, laminate, plywood, epoxy clay, and hardware. 182.9 x 182.9 x 15.2 cm. Estimate USD 60,000 - USD 80,000⁠⁠.

Mickalene Thomas, Racquel Reclining Wearing Purple Jumpsuit (2016). Oil, acrylic, silkscreen, rhinestones, faux pearls, glitter, graphite and flock on wood panel, in two parts. 243.8 x 365.8 cm. Estimate USD 400,000 - USD 600,000⁠⁠.

Sigmar Polke, Ohne Titel (Bunnies) (2000). Acrylic on paper. 200 x 150 cm. Estimate USD 1,000,000 - USD 1,500,000⁠⁠.

Advisory Picks: Sotheby's Contemporary Auction
New York, 08 May 2021
Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome) (1970). Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas. 154.9 x 194.9 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's.
Keith Haring, Untitled (1986). Acrylic on canvas. 152.4 x 152.4 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's.
Robert Colescott, George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware: Page from an American History Textbook (1975). Acrylic on canvas. 199.4 x 294.6 cm. Courtesy Sotheby's.

In anticipation of next week's Sotheby's Contemporary Art Evening sale on 12 May, we take a look at some of the top works up for auction:

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome) (1970). Oil-based house paint and wax crayon on canvas. 154.9 x 194.9 cm. Estimate USD 35,000,000 - 45,000,000⁠⁠.

Keith Haring, Untitled (1986). Acrylic on canvas. 152.4 x 152.4 cm. Estimate USD 4,000,000 - 6,000,000.⁠⁠

Robert Colescott, George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware: Page from an American History Textbook (1975). Acrylic on canvas. 199.4 x 294.6 cm. Estimate USD 9,000,000 - 12,000,000.⁠⁠

Advisory Picks
at Sotheby's

New York, 07 May 2021
Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean Park No.40 (1971). Courtesy Sotheby's.
Clyfford Still, PH-125 (1948-No.1) (1948). Courtesy Sotheby's.
Franz Kline, Mister (1959). Courtesy Sotheby's.

Sotheby's presents a brilliant selection of post-war abstract paintings at their upcoming New York auction, American Visionary: The Collection of Mrs. John L. Marion on 12 May.⁠⁠

Here are a number of our top picks:⁠⁠

Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean Park No.40 (1971). Oil on canvas. 236.2 x 205.1 cm. Estimate $20,000,000 - 30,000,000 USD⁠⁠.

Clyfford Still, PH-125 (1948-No.1) (1948). Oil on canvas. 187.3 x 172.7 cm. Estimate 25,000,000 - 35,000,000 USD⁠⁠.

Franz Kline, Mister (1959). Oil on canvas. 242.6 x 200.7 cm. 15,000,000 - 20,000,000 USD⁠⁠.

Basquiat at Christie's
21st Century Evening Sale

New York, 06 May 2021
Jean-Michel Basquiat, In This Case (1983). Acrylic and oilstick on canvas. 195.58 x 185.42 cm. ⁠Courtesy CHRISTIE'S IMAGES LTD.

Jean-Michel Basquiat's In This Case is the groundbreaking work fronting Christie's 21st Century Evening Sale in New York on 11 May.

In This Case, along with Untitled (1981) and Untitled (1982) are understood as the 'holy trinity' of Basquiat's 'head' paintings, with the latter having gained particular notoriety for being the highest price ever fetched by an American artist after being sold at Sotheby's in 2017 for a little over $110 million. ⁠

In this Case has been exhibited in major surveys at Triennale Milano in 2006, Gagosian in 2013, and more recently, Fondation Louis Vuitton in 2018. ⁠

Frank Bowling at
Hauser & Wirth

New York, 05 May 2021
Frank Bowling, Polish Rebecca (1971). Acrylic paint and spray paint on canvas. 277 x 359 cm. © Frank Bowling. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. ⁠⁠
Frank Bowling, Polish Rebecca (1971) (detail). Acrylic paint and spray paint on canvas. 277 x 359 cm. © Frank Bowling. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. ⁠⁠

Hidden for 42 years in an attic outside of London, Frank Bowling's uncovered 1971 work Polish Rebecca is on show as part of his inaugural exhibition at Hauser & Wirth, which opened on 5 May in New York and will open on 21 May in London. ⁠⁠

Featuring a large-scale stencilled map of South America and Africa, Polish Rebecca is a gleaming example of Bowling's 'Map Paintings' (1967–1971), an iconic series of works which marked his transition into pure abstraction, through the staining and pouring of acrylic paint onto silk screened images. ⁠⁠

Featuring works from 1967 to the present day, Frank Bowling – London / New York is a wonderful display of Frank Bowling's extraordinary engagement with the materiality of paint, which has guided his search for abstraction throughout his 50-year career. ⁠⁠

Joan Miró at
Newlands House Gallery

Petworth, 01 May 2021
Joan Miró, Femme nue (1931). Copyright Successió Miró ADAGP, Paris and DACS London, 2021. Courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co. Paris.⁠

A survey of works by modernist master Joan Miró spanning the 1930s to the 1980s is now open at Simon de Pury's Newlands House Gallery in Petworth, U.K. ⁠

Comprising 39 sculptures, works on paper, prints, and a painting, the exhibition contains a selection of lesser-known works, with iconic pieces including Paris Mât (1971) and Torse (1969). ⁠

Miró's works throughout his eight-decade career are equally sought after and his 1969 bronze sculpture, Femme (Femme debout) is one to look out for the upcoming Christie's New York 20th Century Evening Sale on 13 May. ⁠

Ugo Rondinone at Sadie Coles HQ
London, 29 April 2021
Ugo Rondinone, zweiundzwanzigsterdezemberzweitausendundzwanzig (2020). Oil on canvas, Perspex plaque. 453.1 x 258.1 x 5.1 cm. © Ugo Rondinone. Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London. Photo: Eva Herzog⁠⁠.
Exhibition view: Ugo Rondinone, a sky . a sea . distant mountains . horses . spring ., Sadie Coles HQ, 1 Davies Street W1, London (12 April–22 May 2021). Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ.

Ugo Rondinone's brilliantly garish pigmented rock stack sculpture series, 'Mountain', takes on a new two-dimensional form in his current solo exhibition at Sadie Coles HQ's Davies Street location.

With galleries open, you can now experience the true scale and wonderful painterly surface of these monumental works.⁠⁠ The exhibition is on view until 22 May 2021.

Yuli Yamagata at
Fortes D'Aloia & Gabriel

São Paulo, 27 April 2021
Yuli Yamagata, Cyborg nascendo (2021). Shibori on cotton, elastane, felt, satin, silicone fibre, sewing thread. 180 x 150 x 3 cm. Courtesy Fortes D’Aloia & Gabriel, São Paulo/Rio de Janeiro.⁠ Photo: Eduardo Ortega.

Containing eye-popping sculptures and paintings weaving themes of consumption, the grotesque, and the search for transcendence, the exhibition Insomnia is Yuli Yamagata's first solo show at Fortes D'Aloia & Gabriel's São Paulo space opening on 15 May. ⁠

'The pieces in Insomnia point towards a sort of transition—a deceleration of image consumption. My wish is for the work to be absorbed at a slower pace, to linger in viewers' minds'—Yuli Yamagata in conversation with Rory Mitchell for Advisory Perspectives.

Thomas Houseago⁠
at Fine Arts Belgium

Brussels, 24 April 2021
Thomas Houseago⁠, Vision Painting I (II) Soul Journey - Arizona (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 274.3 × 182.9 cm.⁠ Courtesy the Artist and Xavier Hufkens, Brussels. Photo: Paul Salveson.

'I have never had a hang-up about art history; I see it as my artistic family, as oxygen. My generation emerged at a time of endings—death of painting, death of the author—and since I come from a place with no sense of culture at all, I had no desire to create a false tabula rasa.'—Thomas Houseago⁠

Thomas Houseago⁠'s show of neoclassical and contemporary works opened on 22 April at Fine Arts Belgium and will be running until the beginning of August. ⁠

Frank Walter
at David Zwirner

London, 21 April 2021

Containing verdant landscapes gleaned from the colour palettes of Romantic painters, Frank Walter's prolific autobiographical works are the subject of David Zwirner's first exhibition of the artist's work in London, running until 22 May 2021.

As Ocula Magazine Editor-in-Chief Stephanie Bailey wrote, Frank Walter's paintings reflect 'a journey in search of worlds capable of accommodating the depth and breadth of far-reaching hopes and visions. He was at once a product of his time and light years ahead of it; an artist who left universes to explore in his wake.'

Read more about Frank Walter's life and work exploring his lived postcolonial experience here. ⁠

Main image: Frank Walter, Untitled (Airplanes over boats in harbor) (n.d.). © Courtesy Kenneth M. Milton Fine Arts. Courtesy Kenneth M. Milton Fine Arts and David Zwirner⁠.
Sue Williamson
at Goodman Gallery

London, 19 April 2021
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998) (detail). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998) (detail). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.
Sue Williamson, Truth Games: Neville Clarence – hold no grudge – AboobakerIsmael (1998) (detail). Laminated colour laser print, wood, metal, plastic. 84 x 121 x 6 cm. ⁠⁠Courtesy Goodman Gallery.

Devoting her 40-year career to the documentation of political and social struggles during South Africa's apartheid, Sue Williamson presents her extraordinary first solo exhibition at Goodman Gallery in London, running until 24 April. ⁠⁠

Included in this exhibition is her 1998 series 'Truth Games', consisting of sliding perspex slats brandished with verbal evidence of apartheid's brutality given in court before the TRC (Truth and Reconciliation Commission), alongside newspaper imagery and text. ⁠⁠

Dexter Dalwood
at Simon Lee Gallery

London, 15 April 2021
Dexter Dalwood, Diane Arbus (2008). Collage on paper. 46 x 46 x 4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Simon Lee Gallery.
Dexter Dalwood, Anthony Blunt (2003). Collage on paper. 46 x 46 x 4 cm. Courtesy the artist and Simon Lee Gallery.

We love Dexter Dalwood's cool cut-and-paste collages of empty domestic interiors weaving themes of art history, politics, and personal experience in his wonderfully patchworked perspectives. ⁠⁠

As households empty across the U.K. with the easing of Covid restrictions, the artist's exhibition at Simon Lee Gallery, running until 8 May 2021, is timely, while reminding us of the supremacy of this space over the past year. ⁠⁠

Lucy Bull at David Kordansky Gallery
Los Angeles, 14 April 2021
Lucy Bull, The Bottoms (2021). Oil on linen. 182.9 x 248.9 x 2.5 cm. Courtesy David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. ⁠⁠Photo: Jeff McLane.
Lucy Bull, The Bottoms (2021) (detail). Oil on linen. 182.9 x 248.9 x 2.5 cm. Courtesy David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. ⁠⁠Photo: Jeff McLane.

Lucy Bull creates visionary synaesthetic works, adopting surrealist rhythmic brushwork to encourage your eyes to dance around the canvas and soak in the daubs and swirls of colour in every inch of the work. ⁠⁠

As the artist has explained, 'The marks oscillate from being imprints from the tip of my brush to more finessed and directionally specific as I start to trace these sensations'.

Bull's latest solo exhibition with David Kordansky Gallery, Skunk Grove, is on view in Los Angeles until 1 May 2021.

Bold Palettes at Gallery 1957
13 April 2021
Otis Kwame Kye Quaicoe, Untitled (2020). Acrylic and oil on canvas. 193.04 x 185.42 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957. 
Kwesi Botchway, Self Portrait (2020). 57 x 42 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957. 
Kwesi Botchway, Self Portrait (2020). 57 x 42 cm. Courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957. 

Three of West Africa's next generation art world stars are exhibiting at Gallery 1957 in a group show titled Homecoming: The Aesthetic of the Cool, running until 9 May. ⁠⁠

Fellow graduates of Ghanatta College of Art and Design, Amoako Boafo, Kwesi Botchway, and Otis Quaicoe have made headlines for their meteoric rise and sensational auction results in the last few years.

Celebrated for their bold chromatic palettes and vivacious representation of their subjects, all three artists seamlessly reclaim the ideologies of Blackness while redefining West Africa's position within the contemporary art world. ⁠⁠

In recent years, Ghana has taken centre stage as Africa's artistic hub, producing some of the biggest names in art today, including Ibrahim Mahama, El Anatsui, and Gideon Appah.⁠⁠

Ray Johnson at David Zwirner
New York, 10 April 2021
Ray Johnson, Untitled (Max Ern with Elephants and Swans) (1982/1994). © Ray Johnson Estate. Courtesy the Ray Johnson Estate ⁠⁠
Ray Johnson, Untitled (Cupid with Ad Reinhardt) (1974). © Ray Johnson Estate. Courtesy the Ray Johnson Estate.
Ray Johnson, David Bourdon (1971). © Ray Johnson Estate. Courtesy the Ray Johnson Estate.

Timeless and wonderfully wry, Ray Johnson's Neo-Dada collages are the subject of WHAT A DUMP, a solo exhibition running until 22 May at David Zwirner's West 19th Street location. ⁠⁠

Immersed in the artistic community of 1950s New York, Johnson's collages, or 'moticos', of magazines, photography, and doodles are saturated with gay icons of the 20th century.

These collages reflect the ethos of his New York Correspondence School, which gave rise to the Fluxus movement of the 1960s. ⁠⁠

Lenz Geerk at EXPO CHGO ONLINE
Online, 09 April 2021
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.
Lenz Geerk, 'Photograph Series' (2020). Acrylic on canvas. Six canvases; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and Roberts Projects, Los Angeles, California.

We love Lenz Geerk's black and white acrylic on canvas works from EXPO CHGO ONLINE, which ran between 8 and 12 April 2021.

Roberts Projects presented these works alongside several other new paintings by Evan Nesbit, and Brenna Youngblood. ⁠⁠

Rebecca Warren at Matthew Marks Gallery
New York, 09 April 2021
Rebecca Warren, The Territory 2020. Hand-painted bronze on painted MDF pedestal. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery.

Rebecca Warren is an artist much loved by Ocula Advisor Rory Mitchell, and her latest exhibition at Matthew Marks Gallery is sublime. Among nine hand-painted bronze sculptures is this standout two-part work titled The Territory (2020).

Despite having the appearance of MDF and plywood, the lower arrangements have actually been cast in bronze and meticulously painted to replicate the original pieces of wood from her studio. Each part looks absurdly identical to the other, but on closer inspection, there are subtle differences.

This doubling has been a recurring theme throughout much of Warren's career, although the flag-like figures with richly painted symbols contain an otherworldly feel that is refreshingly new within her oeuvre, and in stark contrast to the seemingly everyday studio materials on which they rest.

Rebecca Warren is also represented by Maureen Paley in London and Galerie Max Hetzler in Berlin and Paris.

Asuka Anastacia Ogawa at Blum & Poe
Los Angeles, 07 April 2021
Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Home (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 215.9 x 241.3 x 4.4 cm. © Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/NewYork/Tokyo⁠⁠.
Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Home (2021) (detail). Acrylic on canvas. 215.9 x 241.3 x 4.4 cm. © Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/NewYork/Tokyo⁠⁠.
Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Home (2021) (detail). Acrylic on canvas. 215.9 x 241.3 x 4.4 cm. © Asuka Anastacia Ogawa, Courtesy the artist and Blum & Poe, Los Angeles/NewYork/Tokyo⁠⁠.

Blum & Poe are showing captivating paintings by Asuka Anastacia Ogawa at their Los Angeles space.

Marking a year since being taken on by the gallery, these works showcase Ogawa's use of flat planes of colour and muted tones that seem to enhance her figures' piercing eyes, unnervingly gazing out towards us.

In Ocula Magazine Associate Editor Tessa Moldan delved further into ⁠Ogawa's dream-like settings, remarking that Ogawa's paintings are 'rooted in a sense of wonderment and the unknown.'

Rudolf Stingel at Sadie Coles HQ
London, 03 April 2021
Rudolf Stingel, Kirchner Wald im Winter 1925 (2021). Exhibition view: Sadie Coles HQ, 8 Bury Street, London (2021). © Rudolf Stingel. Courtesy Sadie Coles HQ, London. Photo: Robert Glowacki⁠.

Fostering his sublime photorealist mountainscapes, Rudolf Stingel's conceptual approach to art-making is brilliantly exemplified in this replica of the German Expressionist Ernst Ludwig Kirchner's 1925 work Wald im Winter, on view at Sadie Coles HQ. ⁠

While the vibrant pink undertones and thick gestural strokes perfectly mirror the original, on closer inspection, Stingel's characteristic interrogation of a painting's authenticity shines through.⁠

Mimosa Echard at Galerie Chantal Crousel
Paris, 02 April 2021
Mimosa Echard, Numbs (Narcisse) (2021). Aluminium frame, analogue photographic print, glass beads, plastic beads, mirrors, elastics, bracelets, synthetic hair, flower pistils, silk rope, fake flower pistils, electric cables, capsules, glass bulbs, sequin thread, pearl beads, organza, acrylic medium, acrylic lacquer, gloss. 260 x 120 x 6 cm. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Aurélien Mole. 
Mimosa Echard, Numbs (Narcisse) (2021) (detail). Aluminium frame, analogue photographic print, glass beads, plastic beads, mirrors, elastics, bracelets, synthetic hair, flower pistils, silk rope, fake flower pistils, electric cables, capsules, glass bulbs, sequin thread, pearl beads, organza, acrylic medium, acrylic lacquer, gloss. 260 x 120 x 6 cm. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. Photo: Aurélien Mole. 

A recent discovery by Ocula Advisor Simon Fisher was this wonderfully atmospheric work by Mimosa Echard from her inaugural exhibition Numbs at Galerie Chantal Crousel.

Living and working in Paris, Echard's work looks to reexamine the binary between nature and technology by intermixing organic and manufactured materials through collage; a technique which closely aligns her practice with the appropriated reality and assemblage works of artists of the Nouveau Réalisme movement in 1960s Paris.⁠⁠

Park Seo-Bo at White Cube
London, 30 March 2021

The spectacular Park Seo-Bo exhibition at White Cube's Bermondsey space will open to the public on 13 April.

Seo-Bo is one of the most celebrated Korean contemporary artists and a leading figure from the Dansaekhwa movement, which included internationally renowned abstract painters Yun Hyong-keun, Kim Tschang-yeul, Chung Sang-Hwa, and Lee Ufan.

Since 1962, Seo-Bo has incorporated Korean hanji paper into his works. As he has explained in Ocula Magazine, 'hanji absorbs colour and becomes one with the paint. The Eastern view on nature disagrees with the idea of revealing oneself. Hanji absorbs everything because as a paper medium, it is rooted in this Eastern perspective.'

Images: Exhibition view: Park Seo-Bo, White Cube, London (17 March–1 May 2021). Photo: Eva Fuchs, Ocula.
Arshile Gorky at Sotheby's
Online, 27 March 2021

This stunning Arshile Gorky painting, Garden in Sochi (1941) was a highlight for us from the Sotheby's cross-category sale on 25 March 2021 and sold for well over the estimate, fetching GBP 8,585,700 (including buyer's premium).

Main image: Arshile Gorky, Garden in Sochi (ca. 1940–1941). Courtesy Sotheby's.
William Kentridge at Marian Goodman Gallery
New York, 20 March 2021
William Kentridge, Lekkerbreek (2013). Linocut on Universal Technological Dictionary (or Familiar Explanation of the Terms) used in all Arts and Sciences by George Crabb. 182.9 x 121.3 x 5.1 cm (framed). © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery.
William Kentridge, Mantegna (2016). Edition of 12 plus 4 artist's proofs. Woodcut printed from 12 woodblocks onto 21 sheets of various sizes of Somerset Soft. 215.6 x 213.4 x 7 cm (framed). © the artist. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery.

William Kentridge's show of prints at Marian Goodman Gallery in New York is nothing short of a spectacle.

Lekkerbreek reveals Kentridge's long-standing fascination with trees as a subject, which he paints and prints over dictionary paper.

Lekkerbreek trees are indigenous to Southern Africa, and through placing them within the context of words, they recall a series of associations relating back to Kentridge's childhood.

Touching on themes of procession, history, and memory, the woodcut print Mantegna reimagines Andrea Mantegna's painting Triumphs of Caesar (1484–192), as a means of expressing the weight of one's history.

Isabella Ducrot at Capitain Petzel
Berlin, 19 March 2021
Isabella Ducrot, Eros III (2000). Signed and dated recto, colour and china ink on paper. 170.5 x 131 cm (framed). © the artist. Courtesy Capitain Petzel, Berlin. Photo: Jens Ziehe.

Isabella Ducrot's works on view at Capitain Petzel in Berlin fuse fabrics and drawings that she collected in China, India, and Tibet.

The Rome-based artist, who collected these materials on travels to Asia with her friend and fellow painter Cy Twombly, explores themes of sensuality through the depiction of touch and human emotion.

The artist's solo exhibition runs until 17 April 2021.

Chung Chang-Sup at Axel Vervoordt
Hong Kong, 14 March 2021
Chung Chang-Sup, Meditation (1991). Mulberry fibre, burlap canvas. 130 x 162 cm. Courtesy Axel Vervoordt Gallery, Hong Kong.⁠

Chung Chang-Sup's solo show at Axel Vervoordt, Hong Kong, presents his exploration into 'tak', a natural material from Korea's indigenous mulberry tree.

Through this material, Chung contemplates Korean identity, having grown up in Korea in the years following the Japanese occupation. The artist played a key role in the Dansaekhwa movement of 1970s South Korea.⁠

Louise Bonnet at Galerie Max Hetzler
Online, 12 March 2021
Louise Bonnet, Untitled (2021). Coloured pencil on paper. 64 x 76.8 cm (framed). Courtesy Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin | Paris | London. Photo: def image © Louise Bonnet.

We loved this brilliantly strange coloured pencil on paper work from Louise Bonnet's OVR with Galerie Max Hetzler, echoing the accentuated Surrealist forms of Man Ray and Dorothea Tanning.

Thomas Demand at FIAC
Online, 09 March 2021
Thomas Demand, Canopy (2020) C-print/Diasec. 180 × 144 cm. © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2021. Courtesy Sprüth Magers.

A highlight from last week's FIAC OVR. Thomas Demand's recent show at Sprüth Magers is exceptional.

Demand's painstakingly detailed and unique approach to model-making and photographing challenges how we make and absorb images, and interrogates artists', as well as society's, relationship with appropriation.

Cindy Sherman at FIAC
Online, 06 March 2021
Cindy Sherman, Untitled (1989). Chromogenic color print. 96.5 x 69.9 cm. Edition of 6, AP 1/1. Courtesy Metro Pictures.

One of Cindy Sherman's 'History Portraits' from the late 1980s featured in Metro Pictures' FIAC OVR last week.

Sherman humorously plays with Old Master portraiture tropes, whilst alluding to the male gaze and more specifically, the objectification of women.

Takesada Matsutani at FIAC
Online, 05 March 2021
Takesada Matsutani, Point de Contact 65-12 (1986). Vinyl adhesive, acrylic and graphite on paper mounted on canvas. 162 x 130 cm. © Takesada Matsutani. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Thomas Barratt.

This beautiful 1986 painting by Takesada Matsutani, a Japanese artist from the Gutai group, featured in Hauser & Wirth's FIAC OVR.

Incorporating vinyl adhesive to create tactile and curvaceous forms protruding from the canvas, Matsutani's painting expands the possibilities of surface, whilst remaining tightly bound to the colour black, except for a deliciously deep blue emerging from underneath.

Hans Arp at FIAC
Online, 04 March 2021
Hans Arp, Die Puppe der Demeter / La poupée de Déméter (Demeter''s Doll) (1961, cast 1974). Bronze, Ed. 3/5 + 2 AP, 41 x 15 x 15 cm. © Stiftung Arp e.V., Berlin/Rolandswerth / 2021 ProLitteris, Zürich, ARS, New York, and DACS, London. Courtesy Stiftung Arp e.V., Berlin/Rolandswerth and Hauser & Wirth.

Hauser & Wirth featured this small but mighty Hans Arp bronze in their FIAC OVR presentation.

A master at creating biomorphic forms whose curved lines and simplicity are so pleasurable for our eyes to trace, Arp's instantly recognisable amoeba-like shapes are equally satisfying in this smaller scale.

Tom Waring at FIAC
Online, 03 March 2021
Tom Waring, Plutch Jarv (2020) (detail). Oil on linen. 180 x 140 cm. © the artist. Courtesy Downs & Ross, New York.
Tom Waring, Plutch Jarv (2020) (detail). Oil on linen. 180 x 140 cm. © the artist. Courtesy Downs & Ross, New York.
Tom Waring, Plutch Jarv (2020). Oil on linen. 180 x 140 cm. © the artist. Courtesy Downs & Ross, New York.

This recent painting by Tom Waring showing with New York gallery Downs & Ross in their viewing rooms for FIAC was an absolute highlight for us.

Painstakingly created in oil on linen and restricting himself with variations of just one or two colours, Waring constructs claustrophobic compositions that mould together forms and imagery mined from a vast array of art historical references.

Maja Ruznic at Hales Gallery
London, 02 March 2021
Maja Ruznic, Invocation (2019). Oil on canvas. 213.36 x 187.96 cm. Courtesy the artist and Karma, New York.

Maja Ruznic's ethereal works are formed through her experience recalling memories from her diasporic childhood.

Softly rendered washes of oil paint shimmer and fade across the canvas, revealing forms and figures from her past.

Maja Ruznic is represented by Karma, in addition to Hales Gallery, where she recently held her first solo show in their London space towards the end of last year.

Stanley Whitney at Matthew Marks Gallery
Los Angeles, 25 February 2021
Stanley Whitney, Twenty twenty (2020). Oil on linen. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery.

'The only system I have really is top, middle, and bottom. Even if I wanted to make a red painting, I couldn't do it. I have to let the colour take me wherever it takes me.'—Stanley Whitney

Stanley Whitney's gorgeous grids of colour are on view in How Black is That Blue at the Los Angeles space of Matthew Marks Gallery, but they are also a joy to absorb online, such is the power of this sublime colourist's compositions.

Robert Rauschenberg at Thaddaeus Ropac
London, 24 February 2021
Robert Rauschenberg, Florida Reservoir (Phantom) (1991) (detail). Silkscreen ink on anodised mirrored aluminium. 127.7 x 307 cm. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by Adagp, Paris, 2020. Photo: Glenn Steigemann.
Robert Rauschenberg, Florida Reservoir (Phantom) (1991). Silkscreen ink on anodised mirrored aluminium. 127.7 x 307 cm. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by Adagp, Paris, 2020. Photo: Glenn Steigemann.
Robert Rauschenberg, Portal (Night Shade) (1991). Tarnish and silkscreen ink on brushed aluminium. 104.1 x 124.5 cm. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation/Licensed by Adagp, Paris, 2020. Photo: Glenn Steigemann.

Two series of Robert Rauschenberg's works produced in the early 1990s are on show in the exhibition Night Shades and Phantoms at Thaddaeus Ropac in London, which will open after the current lockdown restrictions are lifted.

Where his focus on the materiality of paint in 1950s New York alongside Jasper Johns became the precursor for Pop Art, these works from the early 1990s were revolutionary for his ability to assemble painting, photography, and sculpture into a single frame.

On this approach to art-making, the artist David Salle wrote, 'Rauschenberg knew how to let forms and masses invade and affect each other, energising the surface to build a sense of pictorial consequence, itself part of something larger, deeper'.

Jessie Homer French at Massimo De Carlo
London, 23 February 2021
Jessie Homer French, Pine Forest Fire (2019) (detail). Ex. Unique, oil on plywood. 30.5 x 44.5 cm. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo. Photo: Damian Griffiths.
Jessie Homer French, Pine Forest Fire (2019). Ex. Unique, oil on plywood. 30.5 x 44.5 cm. Courtesy the artist and Massimo De Carlo. Photo: Damian Griffiths.

West Coast is the magical self-taught artist Jessie Homer French's debut exhibition at Massimo De Carlo in their London space.

Homer French's paintings are often naïve in style with unusual details and large areas of flatness, but a sensitivity and softness nearly always pervades.

Henri Rousseau seems an obvious influence, along with Ed Ruscha and his famous painting, The Los Angeles County Museum on Fire (1965–1968).

Charline von Heyl at Corbett vs. Dempsey
Chicago, 20 February 2021
Charline von Heyl, The August Complex (2020). Acrylic on linen. 208.28 x 198.12 cm. Courtesy the artist and Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago. Photo: Tom Van Eynde.

If anyone can be attributed with keeping painting progressive and shifting its parameters—without resorting to the re-hashing of past tropes—it must surely be Charline von Heyl.

This incredible recent painting, showing at Corbett vs. Dempsey until 13 March, perfectly encapsulates her relentless desire to create startlingly unique images through the medium of paint.

Her use of jarring colours and motifs interplay with a crisp flatness that jolts us into clutching at why we feel a certain sensation from absorbing these enigmatic compositions.

A unique visionary within the realm of contemporary image making.

Lubna Chowdhary at Jhaveri Contemporary
Mumbai, 20 February 2021
Lubna Chowdhary, Code 4 (2020). Gouache and acrylic on gessoed board. 29 x 23 cm. Courtesy Jhaveri Contemporary.

Ocula Editor Stephanie Bailey, on Lubna Chowdhary in Ocula Magazine:

'There is an undeniable dynamism in the charged currents of movements, fusions, and disjunctions that are contained within Chowdhary's formal arrangements, wherein a restrained minimalism is offset by the weight of matter, the fluidity of memory, and above all, an enigmatic use of colour.'

Read the full article here.

Ljiljana Blazevska at 15 Orient
New York, 19 February 2021
Ljiljana Blazevska, Untitled (Slika) (c. 1975–1985) (detail). Oil on canvas. 130 x 150 cm. Courtesy Orient 15.
Ljiljana Blazevska, Untitled (Slika) (c. 1975–1985). Oil on canvas. 130 x 150 cm. Courtesy Orient 15.

The paintings of late Macedonian artist Ljiljana Blazevska are a stunning new discovery for us, thanks to the painter's beautiful exhibition at 15 Orient in Brooklyn, running until 14 March.

This fantastical scene is unashamedly painterly and gorgeously rendered in vivid colours. Deliciously unexpected treats for the eyes emerge all across the canvas.

Jonathan Gardner at Casey Kaplan
New York, 16 February 2021
Jonathan Gardner, The Bathhouse (2020). Graphite on paper. Paper size: 51.12 x 46.04 cm; Framed: 55.88 x 50.8 cm. Courtesy Casey Kaplan.
Jonathan Gardner, Reader in the Mirror (2020). Graphite on paper. Paper size: 43.82 x 40.64 cm; Framed: 48.26 x 45.09 cm. Courtesy Casey Kaplan.
Jonathan Gardner, Grand Hotel (2020). Graphite on paper. Paper size: 53.50 x 45.09cm; Framed: 57.78 x 49.21 cm. Courtesy Casey Kaplan.

New York-based Jonathan Gardner's simplified forms and illusory framing devices recall Modernist masters, whilst his depiction of everyday scenes playfully root them in the contemporary.

His refined use of tone and shade assures these drawings pack the same punch and compositional clarity as his much sought-after paintings, though this is exquisitely softened by tactile and surreal details.

Casey Kaplan are showing these works online until 6 March 2021.

Thomas Demand at Sprueth Magers
Online, 13 February 2021
Thomas Demand, Pond (2020). C-print/Diasec. 200 x 399 cm. Courtesy Sprüth Magers. Photo: © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2021.
Thomas Demand, Pond (2020) (detail). C-print/Diasec. 200 x 399 cm. Courtesy Sprüth Magers. Photo: © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2021.
Thomas Demand, Pond (2020) (detail). C-print/Diasec. 200 x 399 cm. Courtesy Sprüth Magers. Photo: © Thomas Demand, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, 2021.

Thomas Demand recreates sourced images in detailed scale models and then photographs them to produce large-format images compelling us to question both how photography functions as a medium and our own relationship with images.

As the artist once said, 'Models provide us with a focus on our world, as its complexity would place an inconceivable load on our apprehension without such filter'.

This incredible image of water lilies is a highlight from his online exhibition showing at Sprueth Magers until 30 April.

The exquisite depiction of natural light and reflection moving across the surface envelops the image with drama and an uncanny illusion of depth.

Mark Rothko and Frederic Edwin Church at Mnuchin Gallery
Online, 12 February 2021
Mark Rothko, Untitled (1960). Oil on canvas. 235 x 205 cm. Courtesy Mnuchin Gallery, New York. Photo: Tom Powel Imaging.

'The whole of man's experience becomes his model, and in that sense it can be said that all of art is a portrait of the idea'—Mark Rothko.

Sublime, available via Mnuchin Gallery's OVR, brings together the works of Mark Rothko and the 19th-century American landscape painter, Frederic Edwin Church.

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