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Zac Langdon-Pole: Lines of Flight Ocula Conversation Zac Langdon-Pole: Lines of Flight

Over the last few years, New Zealand-born Berlin-based artist Zac Langdon-Pole has cultivated a practice of elegant, if at times uncanny, elisions. His recombinations of objects, words, and images—poetry, meteorite fragments, literary translations, furniture, photographs, mollusk shells—emphasise, with a fine-tuned lyricism, the...

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MoMA Expansion: Once the Modern, Always the Modern Ocula Report MoMA Expansion: Once the Modern, Always the Modern 29 Nov 2019 : Mohammad Salemy for Ocula

In the early decades of its existence, New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), founded in 1929, transformed from a philanthropic project modestly housed in a few rooms of the Heckscher Building on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street, to an alleged operating node in the United States' cultural struggle during the cold war, and one of the...

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Hans Hartung and Art Informel: Exhibition Walkthrough Ocula Insight | Video
Sponsored Content | Mazzoleni Gallery
Hans Hartung and Art Informel: Exhibition Walkthrough 15 October 2019

Hans Hartung and Art Informel at Mazzoleni London (1 October 2019-18 January 2020) presents key works by the French-German painter while highlighting his connection with artists active in Paris during the 50s and 60s. In this video, writer and historian Alan Montgomery discusses Hartung's practice and its legacy.Born in Leipzig in 1904, Hans...

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Related Press

From a Dot, Joseph Kosuth Finds Infinite Possibilities

Peter Malone Hyperallergic First published on 3 July 2019

Exhibition view: Joseph Kosuth, 'Dot, Point, Period,' a Curated Installation by Joseph Kosuth, Castelli Gallery, New York (4 April–20 July 2019). Courtesy Castelli Gallery.

Organized by seminal conceptual artist Joseph Kosuth, 'Dot, Point, Period,' a Curated Installation by Joseph Kosuth covers every square foot of wall at the Castelli Gallery's 40th Street space. A selection of artworks by over 40 artists are dispersed within a continuous string of short texts. This string of text, in a three-inch typeface, follows the gallery's irregular contours, wrapping around the walls and dodging behind the pilasters, sprinkler pipes, and electrical conduits of the tidy but still raw space.

READ MORE ON hyperallergic.com

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