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Art Taipei 2018 Ocula Report Art Taipei 2018 10 November 201810 Nov 2018 : Diana d’Arenberg for Ocula

'There is nothing more boring than the story of decline,' a journalist remarked at an art criticism panel I attended the evening before making the trip to see Art Taipei (26–29 October 2018). As I attended the opening night of Asia's oldest art fair, which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, those words rang in my head. Wandering up and down...

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Charwei Tsai Ocula Conversation Charwei Tsai

Taiwanese artist Charwei Tsai's memorising and compulsive writing of the Heart Sutra—a Buddhist scripture that distills the wisdom of impermanence—is at the heart of her practice. Over the past ten years, Tsai has moved from writing to drawing, photography, and film—a selection of which is being presented at the Centre for Chinese...

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Crush at Para Site: What if you couldn’t have it? Ocula Report Crush at Para Site: What if you couldn’t have it? 10 November 201810 Nov 2018 : Hera Chan for Ocula

Drawn on paper by Oscar Chan Yik Long in gestural black ink strokes, Cupid (2015) greets visitors with a sinister toothy smile as they enter Para Site. The strikingly fearsome figure is positioned on the wall of the gallery's entrance, near one of Chen Dandizi's vertical neon tube lights, part of the series 'Tick Away' (2015), along which a...

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Although known as the ‘quiet man of the YBA generation’, English artist Gary Hume is anything but reserved. Rather his glossy, reductive aesthetic and treatment of everyday objects carry a certain artistic and contemplative gravitas that firmly cements a place among the high energy style of the Young British Artists (YBAs). As a contemporary painter and printmaker, and a principal member of the group that emerged in the late 1980s in London, Hume, along with fellow YBAs (Damien Hirst, Mat Collishaw and Sarah Lucas), graduated from Goldsmiths College, London, in 1988.
 
Hume rose in prominence over the early 1990s, beginning with his ‘door paintings’, works based on hospital doors, created with household gloss on MDF and aluminium. Described by Hume as a 'paradoxical object', being both empty and full, the blank stillness of the doors hints at a feeling of depth and possibility, a kind of conceptualism that was a central aspect of the YBAs.
 
Yet Hume’s works stand aside from the sensationalism of his peers. His measured, simplified approach to form, colour and particularly surface began with these works and developed, dealing with seemingly conventional subject matter such as flora, fauna, and portraiture, being often only represented by a few colours and forms, where the edge is the ‘only thing that matters.’
 
On initial viewing, his work shows a clear interest in Pop Art, particularly when concerning the idea of the surface and overstatement, but Hume’s works also show ‘a reticence of style and nuance of colour not usually associated with the movement’. Indeed, as an observer of life as it passes by him, Hume records what he sees in an introverted, almost pensive manner, - akin to the work of Patrick Caulfield - a far cry from his YBA peers.
 
Hume has enjoyed much success over his career, having works purchased by famed collector Charles Saatchi early on, as well as being nominated for the Turner Prize in 1996 and later winning the Jerwood Painting Prize in 1997. Hume also represented the United Kingdom at the Venice Biennale in 1999; and has exhibited at Whitechapel Gallery, (1999); Modern Art Oxford (2008); and recently at the Tate Britain (2013).
 
Gary Hume lives and works in London, U.K. as well as in Accord, New York.

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Featured Artworks

View All (31)
361cm by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary Hume361cm, 2018 Gloss on paper
120 x 361 x 0.3 cm
Sprüth Magers Request price & availability
Interrupted Progress (tbc) by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary HumeInterrupted Progress (tbc), 2018 Gloss paint on steel, concrete
152.7 x 164.5 x 46 cm
Sprüth Magers Request price & availability
Wonky Wheel by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary HumeWonky Wheel, 2018 Gloss paint on steel
127 x 129 x 6 cm
Sprüth Magers Request price & availability
Harvest by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary HumeHarvest, 2015 Acrylic and gold leave on canvas with brass frame
101.5 x 76 cm
Sprüth Magers Request price & availability
The Wonky Wheel (Red) by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary HumeThe Wonky Wheel (Red), 2013 128 x 128 x 6 cm Sprüth Magers Request price & availability
Mum in Bed by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary HumeMum in Bed, 2017 Gloss paint on aluminium
152.4 x 111.7 x 2.1 cm
Sprüth Magers Request price & availability
London Fields from 6 Linocuts by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary HumeLondon Fields from 6 Linocuts, 2012 Linocut. From a series of 6 linocuts
134 x 92.5 cm
Paragon Request price & availability
Mum by Gary Hume contemporary artwork Gary HumeMum, 2017 Gloss paint on aluminium
135.3 x 98.1 cm
Sprüth Magers Request price & availability

Recent Exhibitions

Contemporary art exhibition, Gary Hume, Gary Hume at Sprüth Magers,
Closed
29 September–10 November 2018 Gary Hume Gary HumeSprüth Magers, Berlin
Contemporary art exhibition, Gary Hume, MUM at Sprüth Magers,
Closed
30 September–23 December 2017 Gary Hume MUMSprüth Magers, London

Represented By

Related Press

Gary Hume keeps it in the family at Sprüth Magers’ newly revamped London gallery Related Press Gary Hume keeps it in the family at Sprüth Magers’ newly revamped London gallery Wallpaper : 4 October 2017

Mum's the word at the refurbished Sprüth Magers in London — finally complete and open to the public after extensive renovations that have taken more than a year. The gallery of the German art dealer duo has now expanded across three floors of the 18th-century building on Grafton Street, with its recognisable black-painted Victorian shop...

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‘The abstract paintings all went in the bin’: Gary Hume interviewed Related Press ‘The abstract paintings all went in the bin’: Gary Hume interviewed The Spectator : 26 August 2017

Last year, Gary Hume made a painting of himself paddling. At a casual glance, or even a longer look, it might not appear to be what it is. What you see is a wrinkled, pinkish surface with a sort of dome of curving green and blueish shapes at the bottom. This, to Hume, is a sort of self-portrait as a child at the seaside. ‘I’m on the beach, I’ve got...

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A Certain Kind of Light review – let there be mirror balls Related Press A Certain Kind of Light review – let there be mirror balls The Guardian : 29 January 2017

A show about light: a light show – what might a curator put in? Just about all art concerned with making the world visible in some sense speaks of light, the very condition in which it was made.

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Seeing Round Corners: The Art of the Circle review - the joy of life in the round Related Press Seeing Round Corners: The Art of the Circle review - the joy of life in the round The Guardian : 29 May 2016

A circle is itself, pure and simple, but a world of other things too: a bubble, an eye, a planet, the sun. Casually drawn on a scrap of paper, it can be a hole, a halo, a ring or the Earth itself. Since the dawn of mankind we have been looking with wonder at the full moon in the night sky and the coloured discs in each other’s eyes. The lure...

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