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‘An Opera for Animals’ at Rockbund Art Museum Ocula Report ‘An Opera for Animals’ at Rockbund Art Museum 19 Jul 2019 : Penny Liu for Ocula

An Opera for Animals was first staged at Para Site in Hong Kong between 23 March and 2 June 2019, with works by over 48 artists and collectives that use opera as a metaphor for modes of contemporary, cross-disciplinary art-making. The exhibition's second iteration takes up a large portion of the Rockbund Art Museum (RAM) in Shanghai (22 June–25...

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Zoe Butt on the Challenges and Rewards of Curating Ocula Conversation Zoe Butt on the Challenges and Rewards of Curating

Zoe Butt is the artistic director of The Factory Contemporary Arts Centre in Ho Chi Minh City, the first purpose-built space for contemporary art in Vietnam. Founded in March 2016, the Centre was designed by HTAP Architects in an old steel warehouse, with cargo shipping containers added to its structure. Initiated as a social enterprise...

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Ocula 报告|Condo Shanghai 2019 展览看点 Ocula Report Ocula 报告|Condo Shanghai 2019 展览看点 11 Jul 2019 : Penny Liu for Ocula

即将于2019年7月13开幕的第二届 Condo Shanghai,联合上海7座画廊/艺术机构与14 家来自全球11个不同的城市,如东京、首尔、雅加达、巴尔的摩、洛杉矶、伦敦、纽约、危地马拉城、利马和墨西哥城,为实验性展览营造了一个更切实可行的国际环境。以下是Ocula的展览看点。周奥,《景观/对象WA》(2016)。橡木上固化油墨打印,左: 55.88 × 147.32 cm,中: 121.92 × 152.4 cm,右: 55.88 × 147.32 cm,图片提供:马凌画廊,上海。马凌画廊 × 80m2 Livia Benavides × LABOR × Proyectos Ultravioleta马凌画廊 |...

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Indrė Šerpytytė

b. 1983, Lithuania

Working primarily with photography, but also employing archives, sculpture, film, audio and choreography, the work of the Lithuanian artist Indrė Šerpytytė (born 1983) explores issues of history and trauma. Much of her work has addressed the recent past of Lithuania, in particular the years of the Second World War, the Cold War, the decades of Soviet control and the so-called 'war after the war'. Yet despite dealing with very specific historical circumstances Šerpytytė achieves a remarkable openness in the work. Her themes are universal: the ways in which the past affects the present, the ways in which the political infuences the personal, the importance of memory. Šerpytytė states: 'In my work I treat photography as an emotional expression rather than a documentation process. Through my images I attempt to reconstruct my inherited memory in the attempt to make the past more tangible. By rebuilding the inherited history I try to reclaim it.'

The series A State of Silence (2006) creates an ambiguous archive of relics, combining personal possessions with seeming remnants of bureaucracy. Denying a coherent narrative, the work questions official accounts of the untimely death of the artist's father, a government official, in an apparent car accident.

The series 1944–1991 (2009–) depicts buildings in Lithuania—many now in domestic use—that were used by the Soviet secret services, including the KGB. Accessing declassified government records Šerpytytė developed an archive of the buildings and then visited the sites and photographed them. She then commissioned a traditional Lithuanian woodcarver to make models of the buildings. Finally, Šerpytytė photographed the models in black and white. Her cool and austere presentation of the resulting images—removed from the original sites of trauma by several steps of mediation—opens up a rich space for contemplation. As Simon Baker has written: 'Šerpytytė's glacial photographs stand in stark contrast to the brutal and unthinking character of both the traumatic events and the unacceptable memorial failure to which they refer and, finally, represent. But rather than sealing off these sites from their unwanted associations with an absentminded history of political oppression, coercion and violence, each sequential link in the chain of the process opens up a little more breathing space and lets in a little more light; just enough room for the flitting wing-beat of the irrational and the chance of recognition that comes with it.'

Šerpytytė's new works, the 'Pedestal' series, also address the gulf between past and present by contrasting archival images of statues of Lenin and Stalin, sited in grand public spaces, with their current existence in a kitsch 'ostalgia' theme park. In addition, Šerpytytė has recently begun to address other international sites of trauma and their media representation, focusing in particular on 9/11, the conflict in Syria and ISIS propaganda films.

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Featured Artworks

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Yield. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėYield., 2018 Cotton on linen canvas
35 x 49 cm
Parafin
Virtue. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėVirtue., 2018 Cotton on linen canvas
27 x 27 cm
Parafin
Vim. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėVim., 2018 Cotton on linen canvas
36 x 21 cm
Parafin
Variance. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėVariance., 2018 Cotton on linen canvas
36 x 48 cm
Parafin
Towers. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėTowers., 2016 Cotton, wool and stretcher
41 x 36 cm
Parafin
Tails. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėTails., 2016 Cotton, wool and stretcher
31 x 38 cm
Parafin
Sol. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėSol., 2019 Cotton on wooden stretcher
114 x 114 cm
Parafin
Seed. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėSeed., 2018 Cotton on linen canvas
25 x 23 cm
Parafin

Recent Exhibitions

Contemporary art exhibition, Indrė Šerpytytė, From.Between.To at Parafin, London
Closed
5 April–25 May 2019 Indrė Šerpytytė From.Between.To Parafin, London
Contemporary art exhibition, Group Exhibition, Secular Icons in an Age of Moral Uncertainty at Parafin, London
Closed
1 December 2017–3 February 2018 Group Exhibition Secular Icons in an Age of Moral Uncertainty Parafin, London
Contemporary art exhibition, Indrė Šerpytytė, Pedestal at Parafin, London
Closed
23 September–12 November 2016 Indrė Šerpytytė Pedestal Parafin, London

Represented By

In Related Press

The Best Things to See at the 2019 Venice Biennale Related Press The Best Things to See at the 2019 Venice Biennale AnOther : 13 May 2019

The 58th edition of the Venice Biennale, May You Live in Interesting Times curated by Ralph Rugoff–from London’s very own Hayward Gallery–proves to be as interesting as its title promises. Venice is an easy city to get lost in, and it’s easy to see why Proust dubbed the city’s labyrinth of alleyways a network of 'innumerable slender capillary...

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Roots of Conceptual Art, Caught by a Camera’s Eye Related Press Roots of Conceptual Art, Caught by a Camera’s Eye The New York Times : 3 December 2015

Learning, like looking, takes time. It took until well into the 20th century for photography to be fully accepted as art, longer for color work to make the cut. (People thought color belonged in advertising.) And it's only fairly recently, in the digital present, that hard lines separating photography from painting, sculpture and performance have...

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