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Cinga Samson: ‘a different conversation on representation’ Ocula Conversation Cinga Samson: ‘a different conversation on representation’ By Jareh Das, New York

Cinga Samson 's paintings lay bare the complex relationship between contemporary life, African traditions, globalisation, and representation. His strikingly sombre portraits contain similarities to those of contemporary painters such as Toyin Ojih Odutola, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye , Kehinde Wiley , Florine Démosthène, and Tunji...

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Dhaka Art Summit 2020: Seismic Movements Ocula Report Dhaka Art Summit 2020: Seismic Movements By Radha Mahendru, Dhaka

Seismic Movements , the fifth Dhaka Art Summit, plotted movements, solidarities, and exchanges across the Global South with over 500 artists, scholars, curators, and thinkers.

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Danh Vo at Winsing Art Place, Taipei: Exhibition Walkthrough Ocula Insight
Sponsored Content | Winsing Art Foundation
Danh Vo at Winsing Art Place, Taipei: Exhibition Walkthrough

At the freshly opened Winsing Art Place in Taipei, works by Vietnamese-Danish artist Danh Vo are being presented in Taiwan for the first time. In this video, the founder of Winsing Arts Foundation, Jenny Yeh, introduces Vo's exhibition.

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HomePage Artists

b. 1983, Lithuania

Indrė Šerpytytė Biography

Working primarily with photography, but also employing archives, sculpture, film, audio and choreography, the work of the Lithuanian artist Indrė Šerpytytė (born 1983) explores issues of history and trauma. Much of her work has addressed the recent past of Lithuania, in particular the years of the Second World War, the Cold War, the decades of Soviet control and the so-called 'war after the war'. Yet despite dealing with very specific historical circumstances Šerpytytė achieves a remarkable openness in the work. Her themes are universal: the ways in which the past affects the present, the ways in which the political infuences the personal, the importance of memory. Šerpytytė states: 'In my work I treat photography as an emotional expression rather than a documentation process. Through my images I attempt to reconstruct my inherited memory in the attempt to make the past more tangible. By rebuilding the inherited history I try to reclaim it.'

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The series A State of Silence (2006) creates an ambiguous archive of relics, combining personal possessions with seeming remnants of bureaucracy. Denying a coherent narrative, the work questions official accounts of the untimely death of the artist's father, a government official, in an apparent car accident.

The series 1944–1991 (2009–) depicts buildings in Lithuania—many now in domestic use—that were used by the Soviet secret services, including the KGB. Accessing declassified government records Šerpytytė developed an archive of the buildings and then visited the sites and photographed them. She then commissioned a traditional Lithuanian woodcarver to make models of the buildings. Finally, Šerpytytė photographed the models in black and white. Her cool and austere presentation of the resulting images—removed from the original sites of trauma by several steps of mediation—opens up a rich space for contemplation. As Simon Baker has written: 'Šerpytytė's glacial photographs stand in stark contrast to the brutal and unthinking character of both the traumatic events and the unacceptable memorial failure to which they refer and, finally, represent. But rather than sealing off these sites from their unwanted associations with an absentminded history of political oppression, coercion and violence, each sequential link in the chain of the process opens up a little more breathing space and lets in a little more light; just enough room for the flitting wing-beat of the irrational and the chance of recognition that comes with it.'

Šerpytytė's new works, the 'Pedestal' series, also address the gulf between past and present by contrasting archival images of statues of Lenin and Stalin, sited in grand public spaces, with their current existence in a kitsch 'ostalgia' theme park. In addition, Šerpytytė has recently begun to address other international sites of trauma and their media representation, focusing in particular on 9/11, the conflict in Syria and ISIS propaganda films.

Indrė Šerpytytė Featured Artworks

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Yield. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėYield., 2018Cotton on linen canvas
35 x 49 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work
Virtue. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėVirtue., 2018Cotton on linen canvas
27 x 27 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work
Vim. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėVim., 2018Cotton on linen canvas
36 x 21 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work
Variance. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėVariance., 2018Cotton on linen canvas
36 x 48 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work
Towers. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėTowers., 2016Cotton, wool, stretcher
41 x 36 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work
Tails. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėTails., 2016Cotton, wool, stretcher
31 x 38 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work
Sol. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėSol., 2019Cotton on wooden stretcher
114 x 114 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work
Seed. by Indrė Šerpytytė contemporary artwork
Indrė ŠerpytytėSeed., 2018Cotton on linen canvas
25 x 23 cm
Parafin Enquire about this work

Indrė Šerpytytė Recent Exhibitions

Contemporary art exhibition, Indrė Šerpytytė, From.Between.To at Parafin, London
Closed
5 April–25 May 2019 Indrė Šerpytytė From.Between.To Parafin, London
Contemporary art exhibition, Indrė Šerpytytė, Pedestal at Parafin, London
Closed
23 September–12 November 2016 Indrė Šerpytytė Pedestal Parafin, London

Indrė Šerpytytė Represented By

Indrė Šerpytytė In Related Press

The Best Things to See at the 2019 Venice Biennale Related Press The Best Things to See at the 2019 Venice Biennale 13 May 2019, AnOther

The 58 th edition of the Venice Biennale, May You Live in Interesting Times curated by Ralph Rugoff–from London’s very own Hayward Gallery–proves to be as interesting as its title promises. Venice is an easy city to get lost in, and it’s easy to see why Proust dubbed the city’s labyrinth of alleyways a network of 'innumerable slender capillary...

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Roots of Conceptual Art, Caught by a Camera’s Eye Related Press Roots of Conceptual Art, Caught by a Camera’s Eye 3 December 2015, The New York Times

Learning, like looking, takes time. It took until well into the 20 th century for photography to be fully accepted as art, longer for color work to make the cut. (People thought color belonged in advertising.) And it's only fairly recently, in the digital present, that hard lines separating photography from painting, sculpture and performance...

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