Ocula MagazineContentsView All
Featured ContentView All
Taloi Havini: Reclaiming Space and History Ocula Conversation
In Partnership with Artspace Sydney
Taloi Havini: Reclaiming Space and History By Ruth McDougall, Sydney

Artist Taloi Havini and Ruth McDougall, curator of Pacific art at Queensland Art Gallery and Gallery of Modern Art, discuss Havini's first Australian solo exhibition, Reclamation .

Fade out copy.
Read More
Armory Week Lowdown: Art Shows to See Ocula Report Armory Week Lowdown: Art Shows to See By Casey Carsel, New York

After structural issues forced The Armory Show into last-minute relocation pirouettes last year, the fair returns between 5 and 8 March 2020 with a flourishing programme, complemented by stand-out shows across New York City.

Fade out copy.
Read More
Ella Kruglyanskaya Steals from Art History, Takes Back Gaze Ocula Insight Ella Kruglyanskaya Steals from Art History, Takes Back Gaze By Tessa Moldan, London

For her second solo exhibition at Thomas Dane Gallery in London, Ella Kruglyanskaya's compositions signal the many possibilities of paint.

Fade out copy.
Read More
HomePage Artists

(1894 – 1985), Hungary

André Kertész Biography

Hungarian born photographer André Kertész's brilliant and innovative career began in 1912 and spanned 73 years. Trained for a career in the financial world, Kertész devoted his earnings and free time to exploring his fascination with photography. His early images of family members and the Hungarian countryside reflect his rich interaction with contemporary Hungarian artists during an amazing period of cultural and artistic growth in Hungary. His work reveals a finely developed vision present from the moment Kertész first picked up a camera. His ability to construct lyrical images, infused with wit and insight would remain a constant throughout his long career.

Read More

In 1925, Kertész moved to Paris to fulfil his dream of pursuing a career as a photographer. After a short period of both artistic and personal struggle, his pioneering vision brought him great success. His approach to the medium helped to define the shape of photojournalism in Europe, and subsequently America. During the next eleven years, Kertész built an extraordinary body of work, influenced by and influencing the many artists with whom he interacted in Paris between the wars.

In an increasingly competitive art world, Kertész found his career began to fade in the mid-1930s. With his wife Elizabeth, he left Paris for New York in 1936 in hopes of reinvigorating his art. From the beginning, his career in the United States proved problematic. His vision, personality, and artistic temperament never found a home in American photojournalism. Unable to return to Europe after the outbreak of WWII, Kertész struggled as he was not able to find steady work through freelancing. He finally secured a staff position working for House & Garden in 1947 where he languished for 15 years creating architectural photographs. Although adored by Conde Nast for shaping the look of the magazine, Kertész defined this period as his 'lost years.'

In 1962, at the age of 68, deeply embittered by his lack of artistic and commercial success in America, Kertész broke his magazine contract to pursue his art; consciously redefining himself as an amateur. For the next 23 years, he photographed with the recaptured enthusiasm of his early years in Hungary and France. By the mid-1970s, he had reestablished himself as a major figure in the fledgling fine art photography world.

Just as Kertész's reputation began to soar his wife and lifelong companion, Elizabeth, died in 1977 after a long battle with lung cancer. Grief stricken, Kertész turned to the Polaroid SX-70 camera to express his pain and sadness. Although the elegant images that he produced are quite personal, Kertész's keen sense of timing and delicate composition transform these photographs into archetypal imagery capable of making deep emotional statements about the world around him. He created a powerful and voluminous body of work.

By the time Kertész passed away in 1985 his work was honoured by artists and photographers, collected by major museums and galleries and studied by scholars. With more than 20 books published in his name. His lifelong battle for recognition had been won.

(Robert Gurbo, Curator of the Estate of André Kertész)

Text courtesy Gallery Fifty One.

Exhibition view: Group Exhibition, Brocante: La Maison de Chineur Fondée à Cologne en 1940., Galerie Julian Sander (8 February–2 May 2020). Courtesy Galerie Julian Sander.

André Kertész Featured Artworks

View All (24)
Owl Series (Chimneys), New York by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészOwl Series (Chimneys), New York, 1961Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1969
24 x 16 cm
Gallery Fifty One Enquire about this work
Untitled (laundry lines) by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészUntitled (laundry lines), 1939Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1960
23 x 19 cm
Gallery Fifty One Enquire about this work
Woman at window with chimneys by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészWoman at window with chimneys, 1970Gelatin silver print, printed 1970
25 x 16 cm
Gallery Fifty One Enquire about this work
Sunny Day, New York by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészSunny Day, New York, 1978Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1978
25 x 16 cm
Gallery Fifty One Enquire about this work
August 13 by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészAugust 13, 1979Cibachrome print, printed c. 1979
4 x 4 inches
Bruce Silverstein Enquire about this work
New York by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészNew York, c. 1970sGelatin silver print, printed c. 1970s
10 x 8 inches
Bruce Silverstein Enquire about this work
Washington Square at Night by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészWashington Square at Night, 1954Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1970s
20 x 16 inches
Bruce Silverstein Enquire about this work
Washington Square, June 3 by André Kertész contemporary artwork
André KertészWashington Square, June 3, 1976Gelatin silver print, printed c. 1976
8 x 10 inches
Bruce Silverstein Enquire about this work

André Kertész Current & Recent Exhibitions

Contemporary art exhibition, Group Exhibition, Brocante: La Maison de Chineur Fondée à Cologne en 1940. at Galerie Julian Sander, Cologne
Open Now
8 February–2 May 2020 Group Exhibition Brocante: La Maison de Chineur Fondée à Cologne en 1940. Galerie Julian Sander, Cologne
Contemporary art exhibition, André Kertész, Michael Wolf, Rooftops at Gallery Fifty One Too, Antwerp
Closed
10 September–26 October 2019 André Kertész, Michael Wolf Rooftops Gallery Fifty One Too
Contemporary art exhibition, André Kertész, Window Views at Bruce Silverstein, New York
Closed
28 March–4 May 2019 André Kertész Window Views Bruce Silverstein, New York

André Kertész Represented By

Be among the first to know when new artworks and exhibitions by André Kertész are added to Ocula.

WeChat

Scan the QR Code via WeChat to follow Ocula's official account.

Scan to follow Ocula on WeChat.
iCal GoogleYahooOutlook