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Slavs and Tatars Biography

Slavs and Tatars is a collective of artists who identify “the area east of the former Berlin Wall and west of the Great Wall of China”—a vast landmass where Europe and Asia merge—as the focus of their work. First organized as a reading group in 2006, the group has lived and traveled in the region, which has been realigning itself since the collapse of Soviet Communism and has experienced escalating tensions between Eastern and Western identities—here, populations, allegiances, and languages are all in transition. In exploring the area’s expansive historical narratives and transnational relationships, Slavs and Tatars forgoes a strictly analytical stance for something more associative, intimate, and playful. Their projects stage unlikely combinations of mediums, cultural references, and modes of address; books and printed matter figure prominently in their work, as do contemplative, librarylike installations where visitors may consider their publications. 

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Slavs and Tatars has had solo exhibitions at major institutions including MoMA, NY; Secession, Vienna; REDCAT, Los Angeles; and upcoming solo exhibitions at Kunsthalle Zurich, Dallas Museum of Art, and GfZK, Leipzig. Group exhibitions include Centre Pompidou, Paris; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Palais de Beaux Arts, Paris; Tate Modern, London; Salt, Istanbul; Istanbul Modern, Istanbul; and 10th Sharjah, 3rd Mercosul, and 9th Gwangju Biennials, and the upcoming Whitney Biennial and Berlin Biennale in 2014.

Slavs and Tatars has published Kidnapping Mountains (Book Works, 2009), Love Me, Love Me Not: Changed Names  (onestar press, 2010),  Not Moscow Not Mecca (Revolver/Secession, 2012), Khhhhhhh (Mousse/Moravia Gallery, 2012) as well as their translation of the legendary Azeri satire Molla Nasreddin: the magazine that would've, could've, should've (JRP-Ringier, 2011); and most recently Friendship of Nations: Polish Shi’ite Showbiz (Bookworks/Sharjah Art Foundation, 2013).

Their works are in collections including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw; Re Rebaudengo Foundation, Turin and The Sharjah Art Foundation, UAE, among others.

Slavs and Tatars In Ocula Magazine

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Slavs and Tatars In Related Press

How Important is Art as a Form of Protest? Related Press How Important is Art as a Form of Protest? 3 April 2017, Frieze

Given the current political climate, we here at frieze have been reflecting on the role of art in responding to conflict. With this in mind, we invited a cross-section of artists, curators and writers

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'Slavs and Tatars: Mouth to Mouth' at Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw Related Press 'Slavs and Tatars: Mouth to Mouth' at Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle, Warsaw 13 January 2017, Art Radar Journal

In his 1962 treatise  How to Do Things With Words, the British philosopher of language, J.L. Austin defined a performative utterance as statements that do not describe nor report, and are neither tru

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5 international biennials and triennials not to miss around Asia in Fall 2016 Related Press 5 international biennials and triennials not to miss around Asia in Fall 2016 31 August 2016, Art Radar Journal

From the 7th edition of Korea’s Busan Biennale to Japan’s new Triennial the Okayama Art Summit, these five international events will provide thoughtful reflection on new and refreshing curatorial practices in the context of the Biennale infrastructure.

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China’s Yinchuan City to host its first biennale in September 2016 Related Press China’s Yinchuan City to host its first biennale in September 2016 1 June 2016, e-flux

Madam Liu, Director of Museum of Contemporary Art Yinchuan (MOCA Yinchuan), announced today that the museum will hold its first biennale. To be curated by internationally acclaimed artist, curator and co-founder of Kochi-Muziris Biennale, Bose Krishnamachari, the exhibition will be held from September 9 to December 18, 2016 on the premises of MOCA...

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