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Sunjung Kim’s Real DMZ Project Interrogates the North and South Korea Divide Ocula Conversation Sunjung Kim’s Real DMZ Project Interrogates the North and South Korea Divide

Ongoing since 2012, the Real DMZ Project interrogates the demilitarised zone (DMZ) between North and South Korea through annual, research-based exhibitions that bring together the works of Korean and international artists. Sunjung Kim, the independent curator behind the project, conceived the idea of exploring the DMZ while curating Japanese artist...

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Sydney Lowdown: Exhibitions to See Ocula Report Sydney Lowdown: Exhibitions to See 6 Sep 2019 : Elyse Goldfinch for Ocula

The fifth edition of Sydney Contemporary will take place once again at Carriageworks between 12 and 15 September 2019, with Spring 1883 bringing together a cohort of 27 galleries from across Australia and the region to inhabit rooms at the Establishment Hotel from 11 to 14 September 2019, uniquely presenting contemporary works propped up on...

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Mark Bradford’s Call for Unity at Shanghai’s Long Museum Ocula Insight | Video Mark Bradford’s Call for Unity at Shanghai’s Long Museum 16 August 2019

Mark Bradford walks through Mark Bradford: Los Angeles Mark Bradford: Los Angeles at the Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai (27 July–13 October 2019) is the artist's largest solo exhibition to date in China. In this video for Ocula, Bradford and Diana Nawi, curator of the show, walk through selected works that convey the artist's concerns with...

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Giulio Paolini

b. 1940, Italy

Giulio Paolini was born on November 5, 1940 in Genoa. Throughout his career, Giulio Paolini has been fixated on the act of seeing as well as the relationship between the seer and the seen. Emerging in the context of the Italian Arte Povera artists of the 1960s, he shared with his cohorts a profound mistrust of the commodity status assigned to traditional media such as painting. Working in a historical moment that saw the ascendancy of painting in the 1960s in the form of American Abstract Expressionism and the European Art Informel, Paolini took an iconoclastic position, suggesting that the medium was a 'question without an answer.' He chose instead to embark on a conceptual exploration of the parameters of painting’s status within our culture as well as its physical structure, or what he has called 'the space of painting.' 1 His Delfo (Delphi) (1965) is a perfect example of the artist’s early structural investigations into the nature of painting and its relationship to seeing. Taking its title from the oracle of Delphi, a 'seer' in Greek antiquity who dispensed prophecies, the image is a photographic self-portrait of the artist wearing dark glasses and confronting the viewer from behind the wooden support bars of an unstretched painting. After he transferred this image to a piece of canvas through a photographic process, Delfo became a hybrid object that is both a photograph and a painting, yet at the same time is neither. It is paradoxically a work that refuses both the status and the act of painting while self-reflexively emphasising the philosophical implications of the hidden physical support structure of that medium. In a very real sense then, Paolini has made painting the content of this work without ever putting brush to canvas.

If Delfo asks us to consider the implications of what lies physically beneath a painting’s surface, it also brings into play a discussion of seeing and being seen. Is the artist himself the seer suggested by its title? Though he looks out at the viewer from behind the surface of a painting, neither artist nor spectator can fully meet the other’s gaze, as their views are blocked by the conceit of the reproduced stretcher bars. This frustrating short-circuiting of the relational act of seeing and being seen raises issues regarding vision as well as painting. The question that is begged is how do we see the work of art, but more importantly, how does that work of art see us? This play of vision foreshadows future works by Paolini such as Mimesi (Mimesis) (1976–1988), a sculpture consisting of a pair of identical plaster copies of Praxiteles’ Hermes that are turned to face each other, their eyes caught in a Narcissistic feedback loop of seeing and being seen. Both works invoke the legacy of art history’s fascination with vision and looking that stretches back at least to Diego Velasquez’s Las Meninas (1656), a painting that is as much about the possibilities of making a picture as it is about the relationship between the seer and the seen. In light of this, Paolini’s work looks toward the conceptual future of art-making as much as it does to its past.

Quotes in this paragraph are from Paolini, conversation with Francesco Bonami, Richard Flood, and Kathy Halbreich in the artist’s studio in Turin, Italy, September 27, 1997 (transcript, Walker Art Center Archives).

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Featured Artworks

Les aventures de la dialectique (III) by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniLes aventures de la dialectique (III), 1992 Lithograph
11 3/4 x 8 1/4 inches
Krakow Witkin Gallery
Caduta libera (suicida felice) by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniCaduta libera (suicida felice), 2018–2019 Pencil and collage on paper on Plexiglas case
220 x 530 cm
Marian Goodman Gallery
Retroscena (Una rosa amarilla) by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniRetroscena (Una rosa amarilla), 2018–2019 Pencil and collage on paper on Plexiglas case
220 x 330 cm
Marian Goodman Gallery
Senza (più) titolo by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniSenza (più) titolo, 2009 Primed canvas, Plexiglas case, sheets of white paper, black pencil
100 x 130 x 25 cm
Marian Goodman Gallery
Carte Noire by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniCarte Noire, 1999–2000 Lithograph, graphite and collage
59 x 82 11/16 inches
Krakow Witkin Gallery
L'ospite (The Guest) by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniL'ospite (The Guest), 1999–2013 Colour photograph mounted on canvas, primed canvases, easel, chairs, stretchers, print holder, photographic reproduction and other pieces of paper
Marian Goodman Gallery
Studio per “da lontano” by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniStudio per “da lontano”, 2015 Collage on paper, two elements
Waddington Custot
Studio per “da lontano" by Giulio Paolini contemporary artwork
Giulio PaoliniStudio per “da lontano", 2015 Collage on paper, two elements
Waddington Custot

Current & Recent Exhibitions

Contemporary art exhibition, Giulio Paolini, Giulio Paolini: 1983–2010 at Krakow Witkin Gallery, Boston
Opening Soon
21 September–2 November 2019 Giulio Paolini Giulio Paolini: 1983–2010 Krakow Witkin Gallery, Boston
Contemporary art exhibition, Giulio Paolini, Giulio Paolini at Galerie Marian Goodman, Paris
Closed
15 March–11 May 2019 Giulio Paolini Giulio Paolini Galerie Marian Goodman, Paris
Contemporary art exhibition, Group Exhibition, Invisible Cities: Architecture of Line at Waddington Custot, London
Closed
7 March–4 May 2018 Group Exhibition Invisible Cities: Architecture of Line Waddington Custot, London

Represented By

In Ocula Magazine

Visions of Brazil: Reimagining Modernity from Tarsila to Sonia Ocula Report Visions of Brazil: Reimagining Modernity from Tarsila to Sonia 18 May 2019 : Fawz Kabra for Ocula

Bridging almost a century of Brazilian art, Visions of Brazil: Reimagining Modernity from Tarsila to Sonia at Blum & Poe in New York (30 April–22 June 2019), hosted in collaboration with Mendes Wood DM, offers a rereading of Brazilian Modernism through the works of artists practising at different times, from the 20th century through to the...

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