Advisory Selection: JINGART
Advisory Perspective

Advisory Selection: JINGART

By Rory Mitchell| Beijing, 10 June 2021

The Ocula Advisory team selects their favourite works showing at JINGART, an art fair in Beijing managed by the team of ART021 Shanghai Contemporary Art Fair, running between 10 and 13 June 2021.

Manuel Mathieu at HdM Gallery

Abstract yellow-toned painting using acrylic chalk and charcoal on canvas by Manuel Mathieu, titled Pinnacle 2

Manuel Mathieu, Pinnacle 2 (2019). Acrylic chalk and charcoal canvas. 60.96 × 76.2 cm. Courtesy HdM Gallery.

Manuel Mathieu's 'alchemical' abstraction distils the outside world into drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, and installation—an expansive practice that was recently traced in Ocula Magazine.

Since obtaining his Masters from Goldsmiths, London in 2016, the artist has been awarded the 2020 Sobey Art Award, and has been featured in solo exhibitions at Toronto's The Power Plant and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Including both paintings and ceramic works, Negroland: A Landscape of Desires, his second solo exhibition at Kavi Gupta is on view until 3 July.


Luc Tuymans at David Zwirner

Hazy orange-hue oil painting on canvas depicting a ship vessel titled Venedig by Luc Tuymans

Luc Tuymans, Venedig (2017). Oil on canvas. 107.6 x 207.6 cm. Courtesy David Zwirner.

Gleaned from the Flemish tradition of Realism, Tuymans' hazy and dream-like representations draw on themes of memory and often photographic works.

Exhibited at his 2019 solo exhibition Le Pelle at Palazzo Grassi, Venedig, which translates to Venice, was inspired by an important vessel owned by the Doge of Venice, which Tuymans had seen in a painting at the Bauer Hotel in the city.

The copper-like appearance of the boat in Venedig is a great example of Tuymans' manipulation of light and colour in his engagement with memory.


Giorgio Morandi at David Zwirner

An oil painting on canvas with a few flowers in a white decorative vase by Giorgio Morandi.

Giorgio Morandi, Fiori (Flowers) (1947). Oil on canvas. 29.3 x 21.6 x 1.6 cm. Courtesy David Zwirner.

David Zwirner present this exquisite small-scale still life by Giorgio Morandi, which epitomises the artist's understanding of colour in shaping form.

On close inspection, one realises the importance of what Morandi meant when he said, 'One can travel the world and see nothing. To achieve understanding it is necessary to see many things, but to look hard at what you do see'.

Fiori (Flowers) was included in Albers and Morandi: Never Finished, an exhibition at David Zwirner earlier this year that placed the oeuvres of 20th-century painters Albers and Morandi side by side.


Ivy Haldeman at Capsule Shanghai

A simple acrylic on canvas painting, illustrating two arms stretching down from right to left-hand corner with fingers stretched out, by Ivy Haldeman titled Double Hands Finger Extend

Ivy Haldeman, Double Hands Finger Extend (2021). Acrylic on canvas. 61 x 41.9 cm. © Ivy Haldeman. Courtesy the artist and Capsule Shanghai.

Colorado-born, New York-based Ivy Haldeman personifies hot dogs, limbs, and suits in a limited palette of alluring colours.

Her unique and fantastical paintings are currently on view at New York-based gallery, Downs & Ross, until 19 June.

Graduating from Cooper Union in 2008, Haldeman is inspired by Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, particularly those of Kitagawa Utamaro depicting 18th-century courtesans. The quietude of such prints can be felt in Haldeman's minimalistic paintings.


Cai Zebin at Capsule Shanghai

A dark-blue coloured hand with two fingers holding a black hue worm against a pink sunset background, painted by Cai Zebin

Cai Zebin, Reply #2 (2020). Acrylic on canvas. 67.5 x 42.5 cm. © Cai Zebin. Courtesy the artist and Capsule Shanghai.

Set against a backdrop of iridescent colour, this evocative painting by Shantou-based artist Cai Zebin features a deep-blue hand protruding in the foreground, pinching a worm-like creature.

Having shown with Super Dakota for Art Brussels last week as part of the group exhibition F#%k U & ur DisNey, two paintings by the emerging artist are showing with Capsule Shanghai for JINGART.

The artist draws his inspiration from art history and literature, creating surreal scenes in a moody palette.


Lee Bul at Lehmann Maupin

An abstract acrylic painting by Lee Bul using purple tones and gold velvet laces surrounding a white matter across the entire surface.

Lee Bul, Perdu LXVI (2020). Mother of pearl, acrylic paint on wooden base panel, steel frame. 80 x 60 x 6 cm / 83 x 63 x 6.5 cm (framed). Courtesy Lehmann Maupin.

Lee Bul has been heralded as one of the leading Korean artists of her generation since participating, and having been awarded a special mention, in the international exhibition at the 48th Venice Biennale in 1999.

A departure from the performance and sculptural work of her earlier career, her mixed-media 'Perdu' series comprises abstract surfaces made up of mother of pearl, velvet, and acrylic paint, traversing the conceptual and material realms of both the organic and the artificial.

Lee Bul: Beginning, a solo show of Bul's work was exhibited at the Seoul Museum of Art earlier this year.

Main image: Exhibition view: HdM Gallery, JINGART, Beijing (10–13 June 2021). Courtesy HdM Gallery.