India Art Fair: Advisory Selections
Advisory Perspective

India Art Fair: Advisory Selections

By Annabel Downes | New Delhi, 29 April 2022

Extensive programming as well as a digital platform make the latest edition of the India Art Fair an exciting destination for South Asian art. Fair director Jaya Asokan calls it a 'testiment to the resilience of the Indian and South Asian art market'. Looking at offerings by galleries including Experimenter, Chatterjee & Lal, and Chemould Prescott Road, such a statement rings true. We select our favourites from the mix.


Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran, Multi-limbed Guardian I (2022). Earthenware. 70 x 38 x 30 cm.

Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran, Multi-limbed Guardian I (2022). Earthenware. 70 x 38 x 30 cm. Courtesy Jhaveri Contemporary.

Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran at Jhaveri Contemporary

Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran is a Sydney-based sculptor and ceramist who creates new-age idols that combine elements drawn from his Hindu and Christian cultural heritage.

His polychromatic sculptures recall guardian figures in Indian mythology books as well as sculptures present on temples across the country.

Nithiyendran's work is held in various public collections including The Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney and the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, while his first major public artwork was recently installed at the entrance of HOTA Gallery, a new gallery on Australia's Gold Coast.


India Art Fair: Advisory Selections Ganesh Haloi, Untitled (2015). Gouache on handmade paper. 46.99 x 82.55 cm. Courtesy Akar Prakar.

Ganesh Haloi at Akar Prakar

Born in Mymensing, now in Bangledesh, Ganesh Haloi relocated to Calcutta in 1950 shortly after the partition of India.

Much of his early work was gleaned from nature and landscapes—a direction attributed to the displacement and feelings of nostalgia experienced by the artist and many others in the wake of the partition.

Produced in 2015, Untitled represents the more abstract work Ganesh produced in his later years, in which remnants of landscapes and architecture are reduced to subtle forms.


Sosa Joseph, Your Earth, My World (2018). Oil on canvas. 148.5 x 304.5 cm.

Sosa Joseph, Your Earth, My World (2018). Oil on canvas. 148.5 x 304.5 cm. Courtesy Galerie Mirchandani + Steinruecke.

Sosa Joseph at Galerie Mirchandani + Steinruecke

Kochi-based Sosa Joseph is a contemporary Indian artist recognised for her loose, figurative oil paintings of everyday life.

Earlier this year, Galerie Mirchandani + Steinrueck hosted a solo exhibition of the artist's paintings, which revolved around everyday life along the River Pamba, where she grew up.

'In these recent paintings . . . memories and dreams, struggles and survival, are rooted in the particular as much as they are framed by the common denominator of home', writes Ocula Magazine.


Mahesh Baliga, Elephant Trench (2022). Casein on board. 30.48 x 40.64 cm.

Mahesh Baliga, Elephant Trench (2022). Casein on board. 30.48 x 40.64 cm. Courtesy Project 88.

Mahesh Baliga at Project 88

This exquisite small-scale painting by Mahesh Baliga extends the artist's recent body of work, some of which is on view in his solo exhibition at David Zwirner in London—his first outside India.

Born in Karnataka in southwest India, Baliga's intricate works depict scenes from daily life, with a focus on overlooked moments, specifically memories and moments of personal loss.

Synthesising Post-Impressionist palettes with the detail achieved in Persian miniature painting, Baliga's casein tempera works seamlessly marry Western and Eastern visuals.


Lancelot Ribeiro, Landscape with Spires (1962). Oil on board. Signed and dated upper left. 76.5 x 61 cm.

Lancelot Ribeiro, Landscape with Spires (1962). Oil on board. Signed and dated upper left. 76.5 x 61 cm. Courtesy Grosvenor Gallery.

Lancelot Ribeiro at Grosvenor Gallery

Ribeiro's journey to a career in painting did not take a natural course. Born in Mumbai, the artist came to Britain in 1950 to study accountancy—a plan that was quickly thwarted when he began attending life drawing classes at London's Central St Martins.

A stint in India's National Service followed, before he was back in London exhibiting full-time. Landscape with Spires was one of Ribeiro's first paintings upon moving permanently to London in 1962.

While Ribeiro created a large body of figurative and abstract works throughout his career, landscapes and the use of oil paint were synonymous with this period of his life.

On this theme, Ribeiro explained, 'None of these landscapes are of actual places but a sort of collective experience'.


Anju Dodiya, Paper Trail (2021). Watercolour, charcoal, and soft pastel on paper. 68.58 x 50.8 cm.

Anju Dodiya, Paper Trail (2021). Watercolour, charcoal, and soft pastel on paper. 68.58 x 50.8 cm. Courtesy Chemould Prescott Road.

Anju Dodiya at Chemould Prescott Road

Mumbai-based Anju Dodiya condenses explorations of her inner psyche into self-portraits rendered in watercolour and charcoal.

Graduating from the Sir JJ School of Art, Mumbai in 1968, her work has placed her among the most prominent artists of her generation in India today.

Vadehra's works sit in major collections in both India and abroad, including the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi and the Art Institute of Chicago, among others.

In her Curated Selection for Ocula Advisory, gallerist and collector Roshini Vadehra cites Anju Dodija's 2004 watercolour, Hug, as the first, and most cherished, artwork she ever bought.


Manisha Parekh, Crawling 5 (2020). Watercolour on paper. 27.9 x 38.1 cm.

Manisha Parekh, Crawling 5 (2020). Watercolour on paper. 27.9 x 38.1 cm. Courtesy Jhaveri Contemporary.

Manisha Parekh at Jhaveri Contemporary

Born in Gujarat and raised in New Delhi, Manisha Parekh draws from Indian craft and textile traditions to create her ethereal abstractions.

Receiving her formal training from M.S. University in Baroda, Parekh went on to receive her MFA at London's Royal College of Art in 1993. The geometric draftsmanship of her former tutor Nasreen Mohammedi is present as an influence, albeit integrated into gestural, organic ink forms.

Parekh was one of the founding members of Khoj—a prolific non-profit arts organisation championing the development of contemporary art practice in India.


Krishna Reddy, Dream (1950). Etching with aquatint on paper. 17.78 x 12.7 cm.

Krishna Reddy, Dream (1950). Etching with aquatint on paper. 17.78 x 12.7 cm. Courtesy Experimenter.

Krishna Reddy at Experimenter

Krishna Reddy is heralded globally for his pioneering efforts in the field of printmaking.

An apprentice under Henry Moore while a student at London's Slade School of Art, Reddy continued his studies in Paris where he co-directed the famed Atelier 17—a hotbed for modernist stalwarts by the likes of Picasso, Joan Miró, and Alberto Giacometti, among others.

It was here that Reddy developed new techniques in printing, including the process of etching designs onto printing plates before transferring them to the desired surface, as seen in Dream (1950).

In 1976, Reddy moved to New York, taking up the position of Director of Graphics and Printmaking at New York University until his retirement.


Jitish Kallat, Epicycles (2020–2021). Double-sided, multilayer print on 20 LPI lenticular lens, teakwood. 223.5 x 116.8 x 91.4 cm.

Jitish Kallat, Epicycles (2020–2021). Double-sided, multilayer print on 20 LPI lenticular lens, teakwood. 223.5 x 116.8 x 91.4 cm. Courtesy Nature Morte.

Jitish Kallat at Nature Morte

Jitish Kallat's multidisciplinary practice—traversing installation, painting, and sculpture—zooms in on his immediate surroundings in Mumbai and out to the cosmic horizon.

Epicycles incorporates the technology of lenticular photography into assemblage sculpture.

Culling images from Edward Steichen's 1955 group photography exhibition at MoMA, Kallat weaves images of events occurring within his studio to create free-standing portals of ephemerality.

Kallat's work has been exhibited globally, including the Serpentine Galleries and Tate Modern in London; Arken Museum of Modern Art, Copenhagen; and Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, among others.

Main image: Ganesh Haloi, Untitled (2015). Gouache on handmade paper. 46.99 x 82.55 cm. Courtesy Akar Prakar.


WORKS

Gift From the River II by Sosa Joseph contemporary artwork painting
Sosa Joseph Gift From the River II, 2021 Oil on canvas
106.7 x 243.8 cm
Galerie Mirchandani + Steinruecke
Contact Gallery
Multi-limbed Guardian I by Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran contemporary artwork sculpture
Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran Multi-limbed Guardian I, 2022 Earthenware
70 x 38 x 30 cm
Sold
Jhaveri Contemporary
Figure with Spiky Crown II by Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran contemporary artwork sculpture
Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran Figure with Spiky Crown II, 2022 Earthenware
70 x 32 x 30 cm
Sold
Jhaveri Contemporary
Reception by Mahesh Baliga contemporary artwork painting
Mahesh Baliga Reception, 2022 Casein on board
David Zwirner
Masking/Blue Air by Anju Dodiya contemporary artwork painting, works on paper, drawing
Anju Dodiya Masking/Blue Air, 2020 Watercolour and charcoal on paper
57 x 38 cm
Templon
Contact Gallery
Crawling 6 by Manisha Parekh contemporary artwork painting, works on paper
Manisha Parekh Crawling 6, 2020 Watercolour on paper
27.9 x 38.1 cm
Jhaveri Contemporary
Contact Gallery
Sitting Figure by Krishna Reddy contemporary artwork print
Krishna Reddy Sitting Figure, 1972 Copper etching plate
35.5 x 45.5 cm
Experimenter
Contact Gallery
Epicycles 2 by Jitish Kallat contemporary artwork sculpture
Jitish Kallat Epicycles 2, 2022 Double-sided, multilayer print on 20 LPI lenticular lens, teakwood
226 x 132 x 61 cm
Templon
Contact Gallery
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