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Pierre Huyghe: The Artist as Director Ocula Conversation Pierre Huyghe: The Artist as Director

Pierre Huyghe is a producer of spectacular and memorable enigmas, with works that function more like mirages than as objects. Abyssal Plain (2015–ongoing), his contribution to the 2015 Istanbul Biennial, curated by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, was installed on the seabed of the Marmara Sea, some 20 metres below the surface of the water and close to...

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MoMA Expansion: Once the Modern, Always the Modern Ocula Report MoMA Expansion: Once the Modern, Always the Modern 29 Nov 2019 : Mohammad Salemy for Ocula

In the early decades of its existence, New York's Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), founded in 1929, transformed from a philanthropic project modestly housed in a few rooms of the Heckscher Building on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 57th Street, to an alleged operating node in the United States' cultural struggle during the cold war, and one of the...

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Hans Hartung and Art Informel: Exhibition Walkthrough Ocula Insight | Video
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Hans Hartung and Art Informel: Exhibition Walkthrough 15 October 2019

Hans Hartung and Art Informel at Mazzoleni London (1 October 2019-18 January 2020) presents key works by the French-German painter while highlighting his connection with artists active in Paris during the 50s and 60s. In this video, writer and historian Alan Montgomery discusses Hartung's practice and its legacy.Born in Leipzig in 1904, Hans...

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Ocula Insight | Video

Frieze Sculpture 2019: See the Contemporary Art in London’s Regent's Park

Ocula IGTV 13 August 2019

For three months, Frieze Sculpture (3 July–6 October) transforms Regent's Park, London, into an open gallery with sculptures by artists from all over the world. This year's edition is again curated by Clare Lilley, director of programme at Yorkshire Sculpture Park since 1992 and curator of Frieze Sculpture since 2012. This video, created for Ocula's IGTV, takes a close look at eight of the selected works featured in the park.

Leiko Ikemura, Usagi Kannon II (2013–2018). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy Kewenig Gallery, Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Leiko Ikemura, Usagi Kannon II (2013–2018)

The first stop is Japanese-Swiss artist Leiko Ikemura's Usagi Kannon II (2013–2018), which is concerned with the human experience. The patinated bronze sculpture portrays a hybrid figure: a human with rabbit ears, dressed in a bell-shaped skirt. Created in response to the Fukushima nuclear disaster of 2011 and the ensuing birth defects, the work makes a protective gesture by depicting an open space in the figure's skirt.

Robert Indiana, ONE through ZERO (1980–2002). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy Waddington Custot, Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Robert Indiana, ONE through ZERO (1980–2002)

Usagi Kannon II is followed by American artist Robert Indiana's ONE through ZERO (1980–2002), which consists of ten corten steel sculptures of the Arabic numerals, arranged in an arc. Indiana, a seminal figure in the development of American assemblage art and Pop art, started working with numbers in the 1960s. He was drawn to them from his personal experiences of moving multiple times as a child, as well as for their widespread use towards a variety of meanings.

Barry Flanagan, Composition (2008). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy Waddington Custot, Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Barry Flanagan, Composition (2008)

Barry Flanagan's bronze sculpture Composition (2008) offers a humorous tone, showing the British artist's iconic long-limbed hare dancing on a cylindrical plinth that is supported by three elephants. Flanagan, who became known for his conceptual and post-Minimalist works in the 1960s and 1970s, turned to figurative sculpture—often associated with the hare, but also animals such as horses and elephants—in the late 1970s.

Iván Argote, Bridges (We are melting) (2019). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy Perrotin, Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Iván Argote, Bridges (We are melting) (2019)

Columbian-born and Paris-based artist Iván Argote's Bridges (We are melting) (2019) is a new work created for this event. Consisting of three steel-and-concrete bridges with poems engraved on their surface, it takes the motif of the bridge as a metaphor for the connections between people.

Ghazaleh Avarzamani, Strange Temporalities (2019). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy Ab-Anbar, Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Ghazaleh Avarzamani, Strange Temporalities (2019)

By contrast, the playground slide in Iranian artist Ghazaleh Avarzamani's Strange Temporalities (2019) is inaccessible, having been deconstructed and its pieces mounted on metal armature. Avarzamani considers the playground as a symbol loaded with cultural codes, where the safe environment for play becomes reflective of the problems of educational systems.

Zak Ové, Autonomous Morris (2018). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy Lawrie Shabibi, Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Zak Ové, Autonomous Morris (2018)

British-Trinidadian artist Zak Ové similarly takes the universal icon of the automobile in Autonomous Morris (2018), a roughly three-metre-tall sculpture constructed from decommissioned car parts. The work, which evokes a gigantic metal head or mask, is a continuation of Ové's mask sculptures, which are inspired by the masking rituals of the Trinidadian Carnival—in the 19th century, freed African slaves deployed masks, music, and dance during Carnival as a form of resistance and a means to connect among themselves.

Tracey Emin, When I Sleep (2018). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy White Cube, Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Tracey Emin, When I Sleep (2018)

Tracey Emin—A member of the Young British Artists, who garnered critical attention for their often provocative works in Britain in the late 1980s—presents When I Sleep (2018), a four-metre bronze sculpture of a figure lying on its side. While less shocking than the works she's most known for, Emin's recent creation is no less candid, charged with a deeply touching and introspective mien.

Jaume Plensa, Laura Asia's Dream (2018). Exhibition view: Frieze Sculpture, Regent's Park, London (3 July–6 October 2019). Courtesy Galerie Lelong & Co., Stephen White/Frieze. Photo: Stephen White.

Jaume Plensa, Laura Asia's Dream (2018)

Another work that evokes a sense of the personal and meditative is Laura Asia's Dream (2018), a bronze sculpture, slightly over two metres, by Spanish artist Jaume Plensa. Depicting the face of a young girl, eyes closed as if dreaming, it is an example of Plensa's characteristic sculptures featuring oversized human faces and bodies, their proportions elongated using 3D modelling.—[O]

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