FOG Design+Art: Artwork Selections 2022
Advisory Perspective

FOG Design+Art:
Artwork Selections 2022

By Annabel Downes | San Francisco, 20 January 2022

Shifting between the realms of contemporary art and design, FOG Design+Art in San Francisco brings over 40 dealers and galleries together from around the world. We select works from this unique hybrid fair that caught our attention.


Kim Tschang-Yeul, Recurrence (1996–1999). Oil and acrylic on canvas. 162 x 130 cm.

Kim Tschang-Yeul, Recurrence (1996–1999). Oil and acrylic on canvas. 162 x 130 cm. Courtesy Tina Kim Gallery.

Kim Tschang-Yeul at Tina Kim Gallery

The late Kim Tschang-Yeul is celebrated for his pensive depictions of water drops.

'I discovered the water drop one morning after working at night. Quite dissatisfied with myself, I had splashed some water with my hands on the back of canvases. And I noticed that the water drops stayed there and were shining on the canvas. It was extraordinary. I thought: that's what I have to do. I wondered if I could make art out of this', Kim explained to Ocula Magazine.

New York-based Tina Kim Gallery has presented two solo exhibitions of Kim's work in 2021 and 2019, and his water drop paintings are a regular feature in the gallery's fair presentations.


Wolfgang Tillmans, Nor'easter (2016).

Wolfgang Tillmans, Nor'easter (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chantal.

Wolfgang Tillmans at Galerie Chantal Crousel

An exquisite play on perspective makes Nor'easter (2016) a standout photograph by Wolfgang Tillmans on view with Galerie Chantal Crousel at FOG Design + Art.

The artist's practice shifts between realist portrayals from daily life, as in the case of this work, along with abstract imagery that challenges pre-existing hierarchies around the medium. In the latter body of work, Tillmans utilises a cameraless technique to expose photosensitive paper to light, allowing paper and dye to combine in a fluid representation of the developing process.

The artist's solo exhibition at Musée des Cultures Contemporaines Adama Toungara, Abidjan—the first contemporary art museum in Côte d'Ivoire—opens 21 January 2022.


Brittney Leeanne Williams, Dream Interpretation 4 (2021). Acrylic on paper. Framed: 61 x 45.7 cm.

Brittney Leeanne Williams, Dream Interpretation 4 (2021). Acrylic on paper. Framed: 61 x 45.7 cm. Courtesy © the artist and Alexander Berggruen, NY.

Brittney Leeanne Williams at Alexander Berggruen

Pasadena-born, Chicago-based artist Brittney Leeanne Williams attended Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, graduating in 2009.

Dream Interpretation 4 is one of four landscape paintings included in Williams' presentation with New York-based gallery Alexander Berggruen.

Often featuring a restricted colour palette of crimson and pink along with purples and darker blues, Williams' expansive emotional landscapes traverse a range of psychological states, from wonderment and tranquillity to anxiety and vulnerability.

Today, her works sit in the collections of prestigious museums globally, including X Museum, Beijing and the MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, among others.


Matt Saunders, St. Louis #1 (2017). C print on Kodak Endura Premiere matte paper. Photo: 172.7 x 118.1 cm; framed: 178.9 x 124.3 x 5.1 cm.

Matt Saunders, St. Louis #1 (2017). C print on Kodak Endura Premiere matte paper. Photo: 172.7 x 118.1 cm; framed: 178.9 x 124.3 x 5.1 cm. Courtesy © the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery.

Matt Saunders at Marian Goodman Gallery

Matt Saunders' practice traverses painting and drawing to photography, printmaking, and the moving image.

Saunders' photographs have a tactile quality that is achieved by exposing paper to light that is shone through paintings, so that their compositional elements are transferred to the prints.

Born in 1975 in Tacoma, Washington, Saunders earned his MFA in Painting and Printmaking at Yale University. Since his first solo exhibition in 2010 at The Renaissance Society in Chicago, Saunders has also exhibited at Tate Liverpool (2012) and Tank Shanghai Project Space, China (2018), among others.


Park Seo-Bo, No. 950808 (1995). Mixed media with Korean hanji paper on canvas. 22.2 x 16.5 cm; framed: 13 x 10.5 cm. Signed on verso.

Park Seo-Bo, No. 950808 (1995). Mixed media with Korean hanji paper on canvas. 22.2 x 16.5 cm; framed: 13 x 10.5 cm. Signed on verso. Courtesy Tina Kim Gallery.

Park Seo-Bo at Tina Kim Gallery

Known as the father of the Korean monochrome painting movement Dansaekhwa, Park Seo-Bo's meditative approach to painting has led him to be considered one of the most important artists in South Korea.

The demand for work from the Dansaekhwa movement has soared in recent years, and we are seeing a notable presence of Korean contemporary, modern, and avant-garde masters at Korean and international auctions and fairs.

'Since 2008, the value of Park's work has quadrupled. His work has been exhibited internationally, and is included in the collections of major institutions, such as the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; The National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C., among others', Ocula Advisory has noted.


Alina Szapocznikow, Lampe-bouche (Illuminated Lips) (1966). Coloured polyester resin, light bulb, electrical wiring and metal. 36 x 11 x 8 cm. ©️ ADAGP, Paris.

Alina Szapocznikow, Lampe-bouche (Illuminated Lips) (1966). Coloured polyester resin, light bulb, electrical wiring and metal. 36 x 11 x 8 cm. ©️ ADAGP, Paris. Courtesy the Estate of Alina Szapocznikow / Piotr Stanislawski / Galerie Loevenbruck, Paris / Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Fabrice Gousset.

Alina Szapocznikow at Hauser & Wirth

Born in the Polish city of Kalisz in 1926, the late sculptor Alina Szapocznikow is renowned for her works that function as records of both body and memory.

Part of her series of sculptures produced in the 1960s featuring forms of lips and breasts rendered in bright polyester resin, Lampe-bouche (Illuminated Lips) (1966) was featured in Hauser & Wirth's 2020 show To Exalt the Ephemeral: Alina Szapocznikow, 1962-1972.

Speaking on this series of work, Ocula Magazine explained, 'There is a palpable energy in the constellation of works that chart the final years of the artist's life; an imprint, or afterimage, of her engaged and interrogative presence'. —[O]

Main image: Wolfgang Tillmans, Nor'easter (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel.

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