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Aesthetic Radicalism in ‘Awakenings’ at Singapore’s National Gallery Ocula Report Aesthetic Radicalism in ‘Awakenings’ at Singapore’s National Gallery 21 Jun 2019 : Sam Gaskin for Ocula

Awakenings: Art in Society in Asia 1960s–1990s, a major retrospective at Singapore's National Gallery (14 June–15 September 2019), opens emphatically in flames. At the exhibition's entrance, viewers encounter a wall-sized image from 1964 titled Burning Canvases Floating on the River. The photograph captures a performance by Lee Seung-taek, in which...

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Thomas J Price: Reframing Classical Sculpture Ocula Conversation Thomas J Price: Reframing Classical Sculpture

When the London-born artist Thomas J Price graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Chelsea College of Arts in 2004, the school's college art prize was by no means his most notable accomplishment as an emerging artist. In 2001, Price presented his much-talked-about work Licked, a daring performance, later profiled on the BBC 4 television...

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'Sites Encountered': A Chorus of Five Artists at M+ Pavilion Ocula Report 'Sites Encountered': A Chorus of Five Artists at M+ Pavilion 21 Jun 2019 : Emily Verla Bovino for Ocula

Without punctuation, She Said Why Me, the title of May Fung's 1989 video presents itself as a statement, rather than a question. It suggests a subject who expects no response, a person prepared to make what she can from being chosen though perplexed by the attention. The video follows a blindfolded woman, then unmasked, through late colonial-era...

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Wangechi Mutu

b. 1972, Kenya

Born in Nairobi, Kenya, educated in Britain and America and resident in New York since the mid-nineties, Wangechi Mutu's work has often seemed to bear the gaze of a perpetual outsider, simultaneously drawn to and repulsed by the discovery of another fresh outrage in the lands in which she travels. Much of Mutu's work to date has been concerned with the myriad forms of violence and misrepresentation visited upon women, especially black women, in the contemporary world. Her paintings and collages often feature writhing female forms, their skin an eruption of buboes, mutant appendices like gun shafts or machine gears sprouting from the sockets of joints, their bodies half human, half hyena. They offer a glimpse at the perversions of the body and the mind wrought by forces active in the oppression of women. Mutu commonly works on paper or Mylar polyester film. Manipulating ink and acrylic paint into pools of colour she carefully applies to her surfaces imagery sampled from disparate sources- Vogue, National Geographic, hunting, motorbike and porn magazines. The resulting works are a rebuke to the conventions of aesthetics and ethnography and eroticism that underpin such publications, offering instead an existence that is riotously free of biological determinism or psychological conditioning.

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Featured Artworks

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god hands by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi Mutugod hands, 2017 Paper pulp, soil, wood glue, and wood 2 parts
Lehmann Maupin
Mirror by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi MutuMirror, 2016 Paper pulp, soil, wood glue, and mirrors
20.75 x 15 x 9 inches
Lehmann Maupin
Untitled (Virus) by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi MutuUntitled (Virus), 2016 paper pulp, soil, and wood glue
17 x 17 x 17 inches
Lehmann Maupin
Untitled (Virus) by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi MutuUntitled (Virus), 2016 paper pulp, soil, and wood glue
17 x 17 x 17 inches
Lehmann Maupin
Untitled (Virus) by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi MutuUntitled (Virus), 2016 paper pulp, soil, and wood glue
17 x 17 x 17 inches
Lehmann Maupin
Untitled (Virus) by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi MutuUntitled (Virus), 2016 paper pulp, soil, and wood glue
17 x 17 x 17 inches
Lehmann Maupin
The Sticks by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi MutuThe Sticks, 2016 red soil, paper pulp, wood, and wood glue
27.5 x 17 x 16 inches
Lehmann Maupin
The Sticks by Wangechi Mutu contemporary artwork
Wangechi MutuThe Sticks, 2016 Red soil, paper pulp, wood, and wood glue
27.5 x 17 x 16 inches
Lehmann Maupin

Recent Exhibitions

Contemporary art exhibition, Wangechi Mutu, Solo Exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong
Closed
18 May–8 July 2017 Wangechi Mutu Solo Exhibition Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong
Contemporary art exhibition, Group Exhibition, Protest at Victoria Miro, London
Closed
23 September–5 November 2016 Group Exhibition Protest Victoria Miro, Wharf Road, London
Contemporary art exhibition, Wangechi Mutu, Nguva na Nyoka at Victoria Miro, London
Closed
14 October–19 December 2014 Wangechi Mutu Nguva na Nyoka Victoria Miro, Wharf Road, London

Represented By

In Related Press

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Wangechi Mutu at Lehmann Maupin Related Press Wangechi Mutu at Lehmann Maupin ArtAsiaPacific : 30 June 2017

Born in Kenya and currently working between New York and Nairobi, Wangechi Mutu inhabits a cross-cultural realm in which her hybrid-aesthetics and materiality take on a compelling juxtaposition between science and myth. In Lehmann Maupin's first exhibition with Mutu in Hong Kong, the artist's exploration of biological mutation and matter is...

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Organic sculptural forms and materiality: Kenyan-born artist Wangechi Mutu at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong Related Press Organic sculptural forms and materiality: Kenyan-born artist Wangechi Mutu at Lehmann Maupin, Hong Kong Art Radar Journal : 24 May 2017

This is the first solo gallery exhibition of Kenyan-American artist Wangechi Mutu in Hong Kong. Held at Lehmann Maupin Gallery’s Rem Koolhas-designed space in the Pedder Building, Hong Kong, the exhibition is on view from 18 May to 8 July 2017.In this show, Mutu’s sculptures and paintings are made from organic matter, featuring humanoid and...

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'Protest:' visual autonomy Related Press 'Protest:' visual autonomy Aesthetica Magazine : 27 October 2016

Victoria Miro stages a group exhibition by artists concerned with socio-political issues of their day, who question the status quo and the power structures found within societies, and who take the language of protest as a means to explore its potency. Inspired by Alice Neel’s 1936 painting Nazis Murder Jews, the exhibition draws together new...

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Power to... the art of protest Related Press Power to... the art of protest The Guardian : 19 September 2016

In repressive states, the role of the artist is unambiguous: to assert the individual imagination, the singular power that all dictatorships fear. I remember once talking to the Czech dissident and writer Ivan Klima, who had been subject both to the arbitrary horror of a Nazi concentration camp as a child and the long grinding years of Soviet...

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